Argentina 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 19

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1988

PLACE OF BIRTH: Buenos Aires, Argentina

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: law student, works in television

EDUCATION: some college study

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject has studied English with Argentinian teachers since the age of 3.  He has never studied with a native speaker and feels that this accounts for his accent.  He speaks English, French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese.  Subject discusses the influence of Italian ancestry on Spanish usage in Argentina.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Subject

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/08/2006

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, I’m an Argentinian student. I’m a law student. I study here and I live here all my life. Ah, in fact, I’ve never moved away from this block, I mean, I always lived like, ah, around one mile from the city center. And that’s all.  Ah, I’ve traveled a few times around the world, but that was for a few weeks only. Ah, I’ve only been to an English-speaking country once and that was when I was ten years old and I only went, ah, for two weeks to the States. So, I don’t have, I haven’t been that much in touch with the native culture. Um, I’ve studied English since I was a kid. Ah, you know, first at school and then I went, doing one year, to a private institute here. But the, the funny thing is that all my teachers, since I started, they were all Argentinian, so I’ve never had any native teacher. So, maybe that accounts for my accent. Um, the country where I live is located in South America. Um, it’s a very nice and big country. We have many landscapes here. You can go from the mountains to the sea to the
falls. Um, you can, you can find glaciers. You can find anything. We, we even have the Antarctic portion. Ah, I, I’m really in love with my country. I think, you know, I would go and stay and live abroad for a while but I would always come back — that’s for sure. Well, in my country we speak Spanish, but it’s very particular. Not only do we use different words, but … and a different kind of pronunciation … but, ah, we also have our, our own, um grammatical forms. We use different subjects, for example, in Spanish in Spain you say “tu,” when you wanna say “you.” And here, instead of “tu” we say “vos.” So it’s like using, you know, a totally different word for basic structure. Um, so it, it’s funny and that’s because … we differ from the Spanish people because we have a very important Italian ancestry in Argentina. You know, half of the population are Italian descendants, so we, we, we still have many Italian grandmothers and many Italian words that we use all the time.  OK, finally, now I’m gonna say goodbye to you in Argentinian. [Subject fives Argentinian farewell.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Mitchell Kelly

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/01/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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