Arizona 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 60s

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1940s

PLACE OF BIRTH: Globe, Arizona

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Hispanic/Chicana

OCCUPATION: archivist and historian

EDUCATION: Ph.D.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Micha Espinosa

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/07/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Oh, let me tell you something that happened this morning which is I thought kind of funny. Uh, I have a little dog, and I just love that little dog, but he belongs to my sister. My sister is letting me take care of him. She lives in a condo where she’s allowed pets but only two. Obviously, she has three, three dogs, and someone finked on her. So she asked me if I could take him for a little while, and I said, “Sure.” But I’ve have him now for over a year, and I just love that little dog. He’s uh mixed uh Jack Russell terrier with a beagle. His name is Shadow. And we get along just great. But I thought it was really funny this morning when I left, and I usually talk to him before I leave, um, telling him that the weather was nice, we’re going to go for a walk, but if it’s cold and windy, we won’t be going for a walk. You have to be a dog person I guess to understand when persons talk to their dogs and the dogs talk back to them. I swear, when he looked at me, when I said, “But if it’s cold and windy we won’t be going for a walk,” he looked at me like, with his little eyes kind of like he said, “But I have a sweater.” And I swear, I don’t know where that came from, all of a sudden it looked at me like he said, “But I have a sweater.” And I laughed and I laughed and he wagged his tail. So we’re both laughing about that. So that’s what comes to mind when I’m thinking about the morning and my little dog. We go to the cemeteries a lot and clean the grave sites of our departed. My sister lives here in the valley, and we go once a month to Globe, where we’re from. Our parents are deceased, and my brother is deceased, and of course our other relatives are as well. So we go to the Globe and the Miami cemeteries once a month and clean the grave sights and take flowers. And if it’s a holiday, like Veteran’s Day or something close to that, we’ll take flags, and we’ll put the flag on for my dad and my uncles and my brother. My dad and my uncles are World War II vets – they served in World War II – and my brother a Vietnam vet. So that’s the ritual, if you want to call it that, that my sister Monica and I do once every four weeks probably, sometimes six weeks, but we do that every time we go up to Globe. Globe and Miami – M-I-A-M-I – are two mining towns that are, what, separated by six miles, so most people call that area Globe-Miami, but they’re two separated mining towns but there’s such a rich history of copper mining and the contributions of Mexicanos to the development of copper in those two towns. So my parents, born and raised in Miami, and my family on both sides raised in Miami, me, and my younger sisters and I, born in Globe, and my brother as well, but we were all born in Globe, but raised in Globe. But we grew up with that kind of mining town background and labor consciousness and the importance of unions to workers like my dad. My dad worked for Inspiration Copper Consolidated Company for forty-two years. He was a miner. So that is what makes these towns is mining. Copper mining.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Micha Espinosa

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/07/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject’s accent and cadence are not broad. There is a weakening of final consonants and a hardening of “r’” diphthongs, and endings can be heard. Note special pronunciation of “Miami” and “Arizona.”

COMMENTARY BY: Micha Espinosa

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/07/2010

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