Australia 17

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 25

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1980

PLACE OF BIRTH: Edinburgh, Scotland

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: graduate school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject moved to Hobart, Tasmania, at the age of 9. She attended college in Melbourne, Australia, and then moved to Cold Spring Harbor, New York, in the United States.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Her father is Scottish.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Rebekah Maggor

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

So … my family’s from Tasmania. Actually, my dad’s from Scotland and my mum’s from Tasmania, so I was actually born in Scotland, but then we moved to Tasmania when I was a small child… And I went to school. We live in a small town to the south of Hobart, which is the capital city of Hobart … and … or Tasmania, rather. We live in a place, which is quite remote, so it’s … it doesn’t really have radio signal or TV signal – it’s in a valley, so we kind of grew up without having a TV or radio. Jonathan knows that I’m a little bit kind of illiterate when it comes to movies and music, and things like that, so I’m trying to learn. Um … when I went to primary school in a place called Taroona, which in the native Aboriginal language – it means … it means that small shellfish which sits … sits on a rock and is very difficult to dislodge – and a lot of them around there. We used to catch a bus to and from school and apart from that we didn’t have a car, so it was kind of difficult to get away, so we just stayed there. But we lived right by the beach, so it was very nice, and we could go swimming. There were a lot of interesting animals round about like the Tasmanian devil and wombats, and potoroos – those kinds of interesting marsupials. Then I went to high school in the main town of Hobart, which is a town of about 200,000 people, so I used to have to catch the bus every day. And in Tasmania, schools have very interesting school uniforms. They have … you have to wear a dress, and a blazer, and a school hat – everything like that. It’s hard to imagine that I wore those things now. And so, I was there for six years … and I studied … um … different kinds of science and Latin and German and … uh … um … history – all those kinds of subjects, but then in my later two years at school I really got interested in biology and then I decided I wanted to do biology for my undergrad studies. Then I applied to universities all over Australia. There’s a University in Tasmania that is … it’s kind of specialized in Antarctic studies, because we’re quite close to Antarctica. Though we can see the boat that goes to Antarctica, going to and from the docks and it actually comes into Hobart. And … um … o there’s … a lot of emphasis on marine biology – especially cold-water marine biology there. And I was, at that stage, I was becoming interested in molecular biology and so then I got into this program in Melbourne which is on the mainland of Australia, and I went there for my my college undergrad degree. … And, er, um, I really got even more interested in molecular biology research while I was there. And then I found out about Cold Spring Harbor Lab which is this … lab … it’s near New York, it’s on Long Island, which is well-known for molecular biology er meetings and research, and … so when I found out there was an undergraduate program there, I was very excited and I applied to it … I ended up going there for a summer …f or a winter, rather. It was summer in Tasmania and Australia, but winter in New York, so I went back for a winter, and I liked it so much that I applied for the grad program there and ended up going there and I’ve been studying there for three years now, so I hope to be done in a year.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Sebastian Macieja

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 01/03/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
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