Australia 23

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples.  IDEA is a free resource;  please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 26

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Perth, Western Australia

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: university degree

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject was born and raised in Perth.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: John Fleming

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/09/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I did have a pet.  I’ve had a few dogs, I’ve had (uh) some fish, (um) a little silky terrier called Misty, I’ve a dog now called Ollie, (uh) but, and a bird called Timmy.  The one I have now is a Shih Tzu cross Lapso.  Not really, doesn’t really like to walk; it’s a tiny dog, I don’t live with it anymore, (uh) my parents do, but no, I don’t really walk – take my dog for a walk.  Where are my parents?  My parents are in Perth, in Australia.

TRANSCRIBED BY: John Fleming

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/09/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

As usual with an Australian dialect, the “fleece” lexical set has an onglide, heard throughout. The “price” lexical set is further back in the mouth, lending a sound moving toward the “choice” lexical set, heard in “time, private, liking” in “Comma Gets a Cure.” This back motion also applies to several other vowels: the “goat” lexical set is further back and more open, heard in “even so” and “goat,” and the “face” lexical set approaches a General American “price” sound due to the same back and open quality. The “kit” lexical set is more closed than in General American, heard in “fish, silky, Misty, and Timmy.” Listen for the similarity between the first and second vowels in the last three example words. Australian Questioning Inflection, which the subject discussed before recording, is heard rarely at the end of sentences, and several times mid-sentence: “Here’s a story for you” followed by “…was a veterinary nurse…” and “…area was much nearer for her.”

COMMENTARY BY: John Fleming

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/09/2010

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.