Australia 33

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 29

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 18/10/1987

PLACE OF BIRTH: Adelaide, Australia

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian/Australian

OCCUPATION: actor/musician

EDUCATION: high school diploma

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

He moved to the United States (Los Angeles) at age 25.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

He studied speech and dialects in drama school.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Joseph Zavala (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/03/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, I live in Los Angeles these days, but I grew up in Adelaide, in South Australia. It’s very different from L.A.; um, it was quite, uh, quiet town to grow up in, I guess. I think there was about a million people there when I was growing up, which is a decent size, but, um, it was always considered to be a big country town. Um, it’s always a nice place to grow up as a kid; it was, you know, always something to keep you entertained, but, um, you know, you had to make your own fun at the same time quite a bit. It was safe, and, uh, you know, we lived in the suburbs, but we were five minutes out of the city, which is yeah. … Uh, when I was really young, I loved playing in the backyard, swimming, playing cricket; um, mom had a veggie patch out in the back as well so, you know, playing around in that, and, uh — and then when I got a bit older, I started riding BMX. I really liked [subject laughs] — I really liked riding BMX. Um, I did that for several years.

Um, I was always interested in acting. I would do that throughout school, and, um, did productions and stuff like that and then, uh, got sort of more heavily into music when I started playing guitar when I was 15 and started singing, and, um, I mean those became really my main focus and then my sort of hobby. I had a friend of my sister’s teach me the open chords and, uh, teach me how to read tab, and really if you can — if you can read tab and someone’s giving you the basics and you enjoy it enough, I think you can teach yourself how to play if you’ve got a bit of an ear; and I’ve played some other instruments before, and I, uh, I sort of had a, you know, a way of working out how to learn a song if there was a part I couldn’t play because I’ve done that with other instruments, so; yeah, I had — I don’t even know how many — if it was months or what — of lessons to begin with, but not, not for that long; I just I fell in love with it. I wanted to play every day, so, you know, yeah, taught taught myself from there really. I remember mom and dad suggesting that, you know, if I was going to keep singing, that maybe I should get some singing lessons, um, so, um, I was probably 15 and a half or 16 or something like that, and, uh, and started getting singing lessons. Um, and, uh, it was just down the road: A friend of my mom’s had a pop-singing studio …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Joseph Zavala (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/03/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.