Australia 5

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 25

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1973

PLACE OF BIRTH: Perth, Western Australia

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Egyptian

OCCUPATION: She has worked in publishing and as a day-care provider.

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She has lived in Cairo, Egypt, and in Singapore.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Although she was born and raised in Australia, both of her parents are Egyptian and she speaks Arabic.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Krista Scott

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/06/1999

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I’m 25 years old. I’m currently working as a day-care provider. Um, I was previously working in Singapore for 15 months in pu–in the publishing field. Um, I grew up in Perth, Western Australia. … Uh, my parents are Egyptian. Um, I was born in Australia and raised in Australia, as were my sisters. Um, I speak Arabic, which has probably modified my accent slightly. Um, the best thing about Australia is the fact that it’s multi-cultural, um, when I was at school most of my friends — all — all of my friends were from a different country I didn’t have any true friends that were from the same country. Um, great food from every country you could possibly think of, modified probably also, by the time they come to Australia, and forget about the way it’s actually done, so modified and … and just, you know, that’s probably the best thing–and the beaches, the beaches are fantastic, the nature … um, like the males–the whales migrating from Antarctica, they come across the coast, we see them, the dolphins, and … OK, um … they’re probably the best true aspect about Australia, probably the best three things that I really love. Uh, when I was young, my dad took me fishing one day to uh, uh, a city called–well not really a city, a little country town called Landra (sp?); it’s on the coast. Um, we were beach-fishing … and suddenly like, just out of nowhere I though it was — I actually thought it was a dog, it just like appeared in my face, and it just looked at me and I looked at it, and then when I moved cause I was scar–I’m like t–petrified of dogs. So when I moved it–it dove, and I realized that it was actually a–a se–a seal. Uh, okay, your typical Australian male, which thank God no longer really exists, is called an Ocker, which is actually spelled o-c-k-e-r, so Americans would pronounce “Ocker.” Um, OK, this is your — this is an Ocker … he has a pot-belly holding a can of beer … um, in a singlet, shorts, pair of thongs … um, unshaven … so basically not very attractive. *laughs* This is an Australian Ocker, oh, holding a surfboard, very important, surfing, in Australia, you’re not Australian if you don’t surf. Um, yeah, I just wanted to tell you about the typical Australian male called an Ocker, but thank God they don’t exist — anymore.

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.