Australia 7

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: N/A

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Nowra, New South Wales

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Aboriginal

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: a college student at the time of this interview

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

He lived along the northern and southern coast of New South Wales, primarily near Stony Creek, Nowra and Macksville.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Geraldine Cook

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Ah, I was born in Nowra, ah, New South Wales, on the east coast. [Is that a big or small town?]  Um, it was a small town. Now it’s growing. It’s sort of like a little mini-city and it’s sort of like, you know, the main, sort of, town of that region — the Shoalhaven region.  [Did you go to school there?]  Um, no, I was actually born there but then my parents moved further, um, down the south coast, and I grew up, um, in these … on this … in sort of like in the bush outside this little, little town, um, and it was called like Stony Creek. And then I actually went to school at, um, Bodalla, which was the closest little town. Um, and went to primary school there and um… [Did you go to high school in Bodalla?]  Um, from Bodalla I moved to the mid-north coast of New South Wales to a place called Macksville and I went to primary school there. And, um, from there I moved to Kempsey, which is about forty minutes drive south and, um, went to high school there. And then I moved back, um, down to the south coast of New South Wales, um, about, um, fifteen minutes drive from Stony Creek, where I grew up, um, as a kid. And, yeah, so I went to high school there. And then from there, um, I moved back to Nowra, where I was born and finished my, um, senior years of high school there.  [And how do you define your Aboriginality? Where are you from?]  Um, well, certain places, I think, and States, depending on where you are, um, in Australia, like um, Aboriginals identify themselves as like a certain group of Aboriginals, or something like that. Um, in New South Wales we’re from the Kouris, whereas um, also here in Victoria they…they call themselves Kouris, um and Queensland they call themselves Murrays.  [And you … both your parents Kouris?]  Yes they are. Yep.  [Long, long way back, or…?]  Um, on my mum’s side, yes. On my grandfather’s side, um I…I’m pretty sure that his, um, mother was white-Australian. [Do you speak an Aboriginal language?]  Um, not the full dialect, but um, only, you know, a couple of words that are still left, um, in our community, um, back home. And also it’s like everywhere you go, um, if, um, there are Aboriginal communities that do, you know, live closely to, um, the, um, wider community, um, then, you know, they’ll still have a couple of words that they’ll use every now and then and um, yeah, so… [Have you got any favorite words?]  Um, well, back home I like saying “giliwaa,” um, it’s a word … yeah a word from back home. “Giliwaa” meaning, um, I don’t know how to say it … meaning: going to the toilet; something that you do at the toilet. And, um, whereas here in Victoria they say “giliwaa”, but down here they mean actually…the actual toilet. Whereas back home it’s the, um, doing things… [… the doing of it. And um, when you were growing up in this part of New South Wales, what’s your vivid memory of that place? What do you remember about the area you grew up in?]  Um, on the south coast of New South Wales, um…beautiful. It was close to the ocean and it was just green. And my grandparents owned, um, this eight-hectare property and it was just amazing. You’d go up, um, into the bush, um, on these, um, on these tracks and just walk along in the green…greenness. And, um, hear birds, and you know, go and, um, um, it was…go and get blackberries and um, and banana-passion fruit —they were growing wild there. Climbing these vines and swinging on vines and, um, just go for this beautiful walk in, um, in the bush. And the thing was, it wasn’t that … um … it was close to the beach as well, so it was beautiful just to go fishing and camping and do all that sort of thing.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Mitchell Kelly

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/01/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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