Australia 8

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: N/A

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Coburg, Australia (near Melbourne)

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian (Turkish-Greek)

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

She grew up in a home where she spoke Greek, Turkish, and English.  However, there is little or no trace of her ancestry in her speech.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Geraldine Cook

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Australia, and I was actually born in Coburg. I lived most of my life Coburg, and when I was in high school, about … year 10, my family moved to Pascoe Vale, which was probably about um … 5-10 minutes away from Coburg. Pascoe Vale, is a really nice — a really nice suburb, it’s full of wide straits and there are lots of trees, it’s a fairly quiet area, I think that — most of the … residents, uh, you know are middle-aged to a little bit older. … Yeah, it’s fairly quiet area. Something I remember that just comes to mind, was, when I was in primary school, we — during the summer holidays, we used to go to the local pool everyday, so we’d get together with cousins, relatives and friends and we’d … we’d walk down, which was almost like, you know, a 20 to 30 minute walk, and it was just fantastic … um, being able to do that during the summer holidays with friends and we’d walk through the Coburg lake … and, it was just a lovely walk. I remember I was obsessed with learning how to dive from the high board, and it took me months to be able to get the courage to do that, and I remember feeling…on one occasion I felt  I was just going to throw myself in, and, um, I actually took the dive, and it was a fantastic moment for me to be able to do that. [Interviewer: What kinds of kids hung out at the Coburg pool; was it the Coburg Pool?]  It was the Coburg Pool.  [Interviewer: What kinds of kids hung out at the Coburg Pool?]  I think there were like … a variety of um, different culture groups, there were Italians, Lebanese, Turkish … uh, Anglo-Saxan … Greeks … um, yeah there were lots of — it was a fairly multi-cultural area.  [Interviewer: Do you speak another language at home?]  Yes, I speak Greek … and I also speak Turkish.  [Interviewer: Ah, so where are your parents from originally?]  My parents are from Greece; they were born in the northern part of Greek — Greece, in a place called [unclear].  [Interviewer: Hence, they speak Greek and Turkish. Is that — has that happened?]  Yes, my grandmother also spoke Turkish. She was not a fluent Greek speaker … but um, because she was with us for most of her life um, we had to learn to speak the Turkish language, so I was speaking English, Greek, and Turkish at home.  [Interviewer: So you still speak three languages?]  Yeah, I still speak three languages — we don’t use Turkish as much anymore ’cause my grandmother’s passed away.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Faith Harvey

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/03/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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