Austria 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: N/A

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: N/A

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Austrian (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Mark Ingram and his students

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Ah, a story about my childhood … um, any specific age I should be in or … OK … what’s interesting with my childhood. Well, ah, an interesting thing which I thought like, looking back at it now, is that …  approximately between like, it started when I … it pretty much started when I went to like, went to school, from elementary school on because I didn’t go to kindergarten or anything, so I pretty much didn’t leave the house ’til I was 7, and … my parents were always accepting what I said, I was a very outgoing person, um … I pretty much always liked to present myself, and, so I pretty much didn’t have any shut-up judges or whatever, and when I entered elementary school um … things of course started to be a little more complicated because there was this kind of peer pressure going on immediately … and I … from the start on I was an outsider … like, immediately. And it went on for some time at the beginning first few — like at the first years of elementary school it wasn’t that much of a problem because … I like, I honestly don’t remember details, but it really got worse when I entered like … 5th or 6th grade, and people were really forming this very close community, and I was always on the outside, and … there was a time when I literally went home everyday crying, and saying, “Why are they doing this?” like for whatever reason, and I’m just saying what I think and I’m trying to be funny or trying to be honest or whatever, and people don’t accept it, what am I doing wrong, and my father always told me, you know what stick to it, it will eventually like, be better, someday. And, I did just that … and, I think it was 8th grade, when teachers asked me to … do the major role in the musical, which our school prepared, and had pr– and performed in, I think it was May of 2001. And … I immediately got the major role, it was, it was of course singing included and acting, and … people started to realize that … I was in fact, not negatively special, but positively special, and, they started to like me not in — it was kind of — it was not only because of the musical, but it was also, um … it kind of went hand in hand, like there was a sudden change in my attitude maybe uh, the things that I had already said, I, I now said them in a different way, and I was like — I was — just more self-conscious than before. And it worked, like, people started to accept me, and eventually I got some friends, and, I was … among the bigger — like the bigger group, groups of people, though I wouldn’t consider myself to be among, the masses, but I was always some kind of a …. I still was an outsider, but from then on, I was, like a very fancy outsider, like people liked me and accepted me, and I was always like — like if I was going to — like there was then in high school afterwards, then it turned out to be — turned out to be … it became … more and more this way, that people really appreciated my presence, like, you’re going to the party, ah, I’m going as well at a party, and it really became kind of a…I’m not saying I was a star or anything, but I had certain … I was immune to certain … things that other people would — wouldn’t have, like … I’m talking about something I can’t really … I can’t really say ’cause I lack some words, but so, there was — it was this kind of a shift about at an age — an age — about 14…when I suddenly became aware of it, um yeah, I am different than most of the people, and, I’m going to stick to that, and I’m gonna become an actor, and anyone who says, yeah, don’t even bother trying, try to be normal, thanks, I don’t appreciate your opinion, so that’s why I’m here at the [unclear] school.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Faith Harvey

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/03/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.