Bangladesh 1

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 30

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 21/12/1982

PLACE OF BIRTH: Dhaka, Bangladesh

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Bangalis

OCCUPATION: Phd student

EDUCATION: master’s degree

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject did not live outside of Bangladesh until moving to North Dakota, in the United States, for school. He resided in North Dakota for two years and had been living in Kansas for two years when recorded.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

He was taught English at a young age.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Jordan Partin (under supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 31/10/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and, uh, well I … my family lived in Bangla, lives in Bangladesh. I have one brother, and my parents live there and, uh, I … I also have a family over here. I have my wife and my 5-years-old kid living with me here. So that’s all with me; anything else? My family here in the United states: Oh, no, they are dependent on me because like I’m getting paid from the … from the grad school. So, like they are not allowed to do anything. My wife is not allowed to do work, so she is just right now taking care of my kid, and she’s also going to start her education next semester. So probably she would be a student and also from the next semester, and my kid: He is just going to the Hillcrest School, that’s all. Yeah, he’s 5. Uh, it’s hard to remember because, like in our country, you were taught English from the pre-school. So it was like, ah, like when I see my kid learning the English for the first time here, ah, I mean he went to the preschool during the [unclear], during the last year, but it was kind of similar, but our accent was a very different; that’s a different story, and I [coughs] stress my kid a lot to like, uh, learn how to read it, like he can read story books now that is, uh, for the kids like ages 5 or something like that. I wasn’t that good at reading English at that time and mainly the accent, but in our country also, like they put a lot of stress on the grammar and other stuff so, uh, I mean I really don’t remember, like, my first interaction with English, but there were some issues, like, ah, when I was, uh, a teenager we did a lot of English grammar stuff, but I think that’s pretty common, like, in the school. That’s it.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jordan Partin (under supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/11/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.