Brazil 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1979

PLACE OF BIRTH: Resende, Brazil

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Brazilian (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: college student in journalism

EDUCATION: three years of college study

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

At the time of the interview, the subject had lived in Kansas for three years and in Oklahoma, in the United States, for six months.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

She began studying English in private courses at 6 years of age.  Her vocabulary reflects her education, and her English is influenced by her private education.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Kelly Mengelkoch (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/03/2001

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in a small city called Resende, which is two hours driving from Rio. It’s a small town – not really small – it’s (like) about 100-150 thousand inhabitants, and it’s really nice. I grew up there; I went to school there. I started studying English when I was 6 years old – in the private course. Then I took some English course in school, but it was not as good as the private course, so I went to school there until my last year of high school. I came to United States and I lived in Oklahoma as an exchange student for six months, which is a very good experience. I got to improve my English: I got to play tennis on the varsity team – great experience. … I went back to Brazil, then I went to college there for a year studying journalism, and then I got a scholarship to come back to United States to KU, study(ing) journalism. (And) now I’ve been living here for about two and a half, almost three years, and I enjoyed it a lot. I made a lot of new friends. I am part of the Brazilian club; I am the vice president. We get to organize a lot of cool events and get to meet new people and … I guess it was spending the day at my grandmother’s house, every, after school I just went there and just played around and eat a lot of good food and on the weekends I just loved to be there. (And) I just played in the street with my cousins and it was really nice. [Subject recites part of the Brazilian National Anthem in Portuguese]:
Ouviram do Ipiranga as margens plácidas
De um povo heróico o brado retumbante,
E o sol da liberdade, em raios fúlgidos,
Brilhou no céu da Pátria nesse instante.
[English translation]:
The peaceful banks of the Ipiranga
Heard the resounding cry of an heroic people,
And the dazzling rays of the sun of Liberty
Bathed our country in their brilliant light.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Kelly Mengelkoch (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/2001

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Her English is influenced by her private courses throughout her years of schooling, as well as public education. Her vocabulary reflects her education, while one is able to detect the influence of Portuguese on her pronunciation and through line of syntax in thought and occasional conversation.

COMMENTARY BY: Kelly Mengelkoch (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/03/2001

The archive provides:

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  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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