Brazil 10

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 44

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/06/1972

PLACE OF BIRTH: Encruzilhada do Sul

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian/Brazilian/Indigenous/African

OCCUPATION: Head of Course – BA World Performance; lecturer in acting

EDUCATION: Ph.D

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in London, England, from 1997 to 2000, and again from 2015 to the time of this recording.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject moved around Brazil while growing up, so his Brazilian accent is influenced by different local dialects. He has some Indigenous and African ethnicity in his ancestry. He spent most of his formative years in Porto Alegre.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Flloyd Kennedy

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/06/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Ah, I was born in 1972, on 11th of June, 1972. So I’m 44 years old. First time I came to England was in 197-, eh, 1977. I came because I wanted to do my master course here, but then once I arrive here I realise I couldn’t speak English. I thought I could because I had done a course in Brazil — an English course in Brazil — but then when I got here, I spent a couple of weeks in a friend’s house, and I went straight for an interview an’ – in a drama school, a university. And I could no’ understand not even one word f-from that interview. So it was really embarrassing. Then I — I just thought to myself, no, I’m just like, ah, as we say in Brazil, “I’m putting the horses in front of the carriage.” I don’t know if you have this expression here. But that’s how I felt. An’ I decided that – OK, calm down; you first need a bit of time in England to be able to speak properly, or at least to be able to understand something, before trying to get into university. So I spend one year here, from 19-, 1997 to 1998, just working as bar tender, ah, waiter, doing many different jobs in pubs and bars and restaurants, and ah, eh, studying in English schools. And because I didn’t have any money, I used to go and do one week free trial in each [laughs] school. So I did all those Oxford street schools, one after the other one, just the first-week trial. That was my trick to try to learn something without spending any money. Then I got work because in 19-, eh, 1980, ah, I went again for an interview in another university, now closer to what I wanted to do, because throughout that year I found out what I really wanted to do, and I got accepted. At the same time, I got a grant from Brazil to pay for my studies. So is all perfect timing, an’ I spent three more years in UK until the end of 2000. I did my MFA in (is) directing, and by the end of 2000 I went back to Brazil. An’ I spent 14 years in Brazil, an’ now, since January 2015, I’m back in London.

[Subject repeats the above information in Portuguese and tells an additional anecdote.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Flloyd Kennedy

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/06/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.