Brazil 13

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/07/1997

PLACE OF BIRTH: São Paulo, Brazil

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Brazilian/Latina

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: college student

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The speaker was raised in São Paulo until she was 14 years old. She then lived in Puebla, Mexico, for three years. After that, she spent three academic years (nine months) in Troy, Michigan, United States, with the remaining time spent in Puebla.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The speaker has an Italian grandmother and thinks that might have influenced her speech. She is fluent in Portuguese, English, Spanish, and Italian, and she says that sometimes this makes her accent indistinct.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Jason Dernay (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/11/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I love it; it’s my home [laughter]. Uh, I really like my major, so, like, all my professors are so nice and, like, everyone is connected so I, I know everyone in my major ‘cause it’s small, so I like that.

I’m going next summer so it’ll be better [laughter].

Oh, nervous, very nervous, like, all the time, but, we’ll get through it. …

Not yet, I start my classes in January; I already signed up.

To be honest, I don’t even remember. It’s been a while. When I was a kid, I wanted to be a dentist, yeah, for a long time, and then I had braces, so, like, I gave up on that and I liked bio, more like the human-bio side of it, so. And, I like helping people, so.

Uh, it’s like how with all the processes fit in and, like, they make a whole thing. So, for example, if you go, like, to chemistry, like, do all the equation, whatever, but, bio’s more like: oh, to understand the process, like, memorize this thing, and, like, if you put it all together, it’s like someone’s life.

Oh, it takes a while. Yeah, I get sick a lot and then, I’m always sick. I had bronchitis, I had the stomach flu; like I don’t like it. …

Oh, so, I’m going for family and work; my family lives there but I’m also going — I got an internship in a hospital. So, I’ll be there for an internship and, like, to take care of my grandma. …

It did definitely, like, build up my character in a different way than most of my friends and, like, my cousins, for example, like, if I compare myself to my family, like, that are back at home, like, my age it’s — I’m very different from them; I think very differently ‘cause of moving. So, like, I had to adapt to, to different types of people, so, like, in Mexico, like, I moved there when I was a kid, so, like, when you’re a kid, you don’t realize but they’re, like, they judge you a lot. They had, like, nicknames, like, mean nicknames because I was white, yeah, I know, but, like, like, moving a lot and, even here in the U.S., like, when I moved here, like, of my accent. Now, it is not as strong, but like when I moved here it was strong, so, like, people would, like, make fun of me, like: who cares? Everyone has an accent. Also, like, because the U.S. is, like, so open to, like, different countries, like, you meet so many different from, like — people from different places, so, like, when you go back home and, like, they don’t think the same way. Like, for example, if I go home, like, I know so much more about, like, I don’t — it changes, like, that and also like, I became, like, colder than my family, ‘cause, when you move a lot, if you get attached so much, you’re gonna move again. So, like, you get hurt. I know, it’s kind of depressing, but that’s what happens: You get a little colder [laughter] than everyone else.

[Subject speaking Portuguese]: Eu tenho 20 ano,s e estudo biomedicina. Nasci em Sao Paulo, uma das maiores cidades do mundo. Sao Paulo tem 2 milhoes de habitantes e ha de tudo: restaurantes, museus, shoppings, parques mas a única coisa que não tem eh praia. Sao Paulo tambem tem muito transito, então toda vez que voce decidir de um lugar para o outro e se prepara porque voce tem que andar. No mínimo uma hora de ter você vai ficar parado uma hora nos. Também é uma cidade muito grande então tem muita fumaça muita poluição e conhecida como a “cidade da garoa” porque chove o tempo todo.

[English translation: I am 20 years old, and I am studying biomedicine. I was born in Sao Paulo, one of the largest cities in the world. Sao Paulo has 2 million inhabitants, and it has everything: restaurants, museums, malls, parks, but the only thing that it doesn’t is no beach. Sao Paulo also has a lot of traffic, so every time you decide from one place to another and prepare yourself because you have to walk. At least an hour of having you will be stuck for an hour in the room. It is also a very big city, so there is a lot of smoke pollution, and it is known as the “rainy city” because it rains all the time.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jason Dernay (under supervision of Deric McNish); transcription and translation of Portuguese by subject

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 27/11/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.