Brazil 14

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 33

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/10/1983

PLACE OF BIRTH: Americana, São Paulo, Brazil

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Brazilian/Latina

OCCUPATION: professor

EDUCATION: MFA in Dance

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The speaker was raised and did her undergraduate studies in Americana, which is in the Brazilian state of São Paulo (about 115 km northwest of the city of São Paolo). The speaker lived in Boulder, Colorado, United States, for three years. She also lived in Stockholm, Sweden, for six months.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The speaker’s first language is Portuguese.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Elijah El (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/04/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Hide and seek, tic tac toe, tag — um, there’s a Brazilian game that is called Betzy; I don’t know where it came from, where this name came from, but, um, it was a game with, like, two balls and two, uh, sticks, and the goal was to hit the ball but not in, like in baseball that you hit it up here; it’s down here. Yeah, um, jumping rope too, I did — I was not very good. …

Totally, um, I usually dream nowadays. I dream that I’m in Brazil and I can not come back here. Um, like, I’m stuck there for some reason, like either I can not find a plane or my husband doesn’t want to come back with me, or I get stuck in, um, immigration, like, they don’t want me to come in. That’s [laughter] my nightmare [laughter]. …

A friend in common introduced us. She was a dancer, and she was my friend and her — and his friend and, um, she introduced us. You’re the oldest, like I am; that happens, like, every day. [laughter] If something is broken at the house, it’s the oldest, always. …

I think I would be a drop of water in the ocean, ‘cause that would allow me to travel far and get to know many different places and many different people and both, like, the sky and the — and under the seas, like, the creatures that live there, live there, and the birds and land and sea at the same time. So, I think I would be, uh, a drop of water in the ocean. [laughter] I don’t know if that’s answers the question but, yeah. …

[Subject speaks Portuguese]: Nasci no Brasil em 20 de Outubro de 1983. Gosto de pensar que nasci na primavera por uma razão e que fui recebido como um presente da minha família. No entanto, nos Estados Unidos, eu nasci no outono quando as folhas caem e tudo se renova. Duas razões que eu realmente gosto.

[English translation: I was born in Brazil on October 20, 1983. I like to think I was born in the spring for a reason and that I was received as a gift by my family. However, in the United States, I was born in the fall when leaves fall and everything renews. Two reasons I really like.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Elijah El and Jason Dernay (under supervision of Deric McNish), with translations by the speaker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 23/01/2018

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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