Colombia 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 23

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Bogota, Colombia

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Colombian (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: college student

EDUCATION: four years of college study in theatre arts

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

At the time of the interview, the subject had been living in Los Angeles, California, in the United States, for four years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Eric Czuleger (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/11/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I am 23, and, ah, I lived in Bogota, Colombia, until I was 19; I’m 23 right now and I study theatre.  I grew up with my mom for the first half of my life, and then we moved in with my dad. And growing up in Columbia was, it’s, ‘cause it’s just so different now that I’m here in L.A. I’ve been here for four years and it’s just a different planet, it, it started with, with the culture you know? People over there are just really loud, rambunctious, they don’t really care about- it’s not as politically correct you might say, as it is here. Um, also the food, uhhh fantastically great, uhh, just that my dad has a saying he says that, “All the food made in the United States is engineered so that it all tastes like plastic.” I lived in Bogotá, which uh, which comes from Bacata, which is, was the name of the tribe that was uh there. And then the Spanish came over and took it over, but they held the name so it changed from Bacata to Bogotá. And now, you know, it’s called Bo- Bogotá.  Yeah.  Mmmmm, I can tell you about theatre there; I can tell you, um, the biggest theatre festival in the world takes place in Bogotá actually, every two years. So what they do is they take troupes from all over the world, and they come and for two weeks they have daily shows, daily theatre shows, troupes from you know, the real deal, Russia, England, they have a guest country every time they have one of these. This time, it’s gonna be next year. And it’s, England is the host country. So they bring the Royal Shakespeare Company to Bogotá and everything- to do their shows over there. And not only that but you can get Africa and Asia and South America. I actually learned about this two weeks ago. Uh, my thing is movies mostly, but for acting; theatre is you know, primordial for me, so …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Eric Czuleger (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
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  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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