Colorado 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 56

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1955

PLACE OF BIRTH: Denver, Colorado

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: teacher

EDUCATION: two master’s degrees

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has lived in the Denver metropolitan area all his life.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

His mother is from southern Colorado and father from Pennsylvania.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Jeremy Sortore

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/04/2012

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

… It still had a small-town feel to it in that neighborhood.  Um, people were close; there was a lot of, uh, ah, a lot of families there where the, the, the fathers had purchased their first house after World War 2, because this would have been anywhere from 1949 through ’55, ’56.  And that’s when my parents purchased the house, was in 1956. And, uh, so there was a lot of people still looking for that small-town feel in, um, uh, in a neighborhood within a large city like Denver. Um, Denver was — still had a — a- even a rural flavor at that point.  I can remember, there were at one point street cars in Denver. And there was a, um, matter of fact, as you go down, it was, uh, Alameda Avenue as, as it went, um, just kind of by the Gates, Gates rubber plant you could still see it in the distance across the Platte River.  You could still see the railroad tracks under the pavement, uh, after the winter snows had melted off.  You could still see those railroad tracks from the, uh, the streetcars.  Um, there were streetcars in Englewood, which wasn’t too far away.  Um, but, of course, we didn’t get to drive very much.  We had one car.  And my parents both had to share it.  I was an only child.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jeremy Sortore

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/04/2012

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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