Colorado 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 79

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 08/11/1932

PLACE OF BIRTH: Rocky Ford, Colorado

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: housewife

EDUCATION: high school, and a business course

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She spent one year in Crescent, California.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject has spent most of her life in rural Southern Colorado. She was raised in Westcliffe, where she was still residing at the time of this interview.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Jeremy Sortore

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 06/07/2012

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Rocky Ford, Colorado. Uh, but my folks just went there. We’ve lived h–here in Custer County most of our lives on a ranch and, uh, south of Westcliffe. It’s, uh, we’ve li– when we was first born we, uh, it was in the time when the Depression was going on and so things were a little rough. But, uh, we had a good life. Uh, we used to, of course, use horses to put up the hay and sowing like that, ride to school and either walked or, or s– rode horses or went in a buggy even. And then gradually, we got lights and telephone and more modern. Uh, I went to a one-room school with eight grades. Uh, we, ‘course there was only about 17 pupils in the whole school, average. And so some grades there wasn’t a pupil there. Uh, we, my folks had a few sheep and, and cows. Uh, so we — there were just three girls, so we learned to work in the fields as well as, as help in the house some. Always, we milked quite a few cows. And, uh, I — would have to milk cows before I went to school. And, uh, so you milked cows and then you changed into your school clothes, and when you got home you changed back into chore clothes before you went and milked and fed the pigs and the chickens and brought in the wood and things like that.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jeremy Sortore

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 06/07/2012

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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