Cuba 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 73

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 27/10/1936

PLACE OF BIRTH: Havana, Cuba

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Cuban (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: politician

EDUCATION: college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject moved to United States and attended school for two years before returning to Cuba.  After university (Cuba), the subject married a marine and traveled across the United States and has lived there since.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject attended bilingual schools throughout her education. She traveled the United States as a young woman.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/03/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, I was born in Havana, Cuba in 1936 — October 27 — which, by the way, is the date that Cuba was discovered in 19…1492.  So that was a great day for everybody, including me, to be born.  I came to United States … through my whole youth … ah … first time I remember it was 1939 I was 3 years old and I loved the beach — I was in Miami Beach.  After that, we came and lived in United States when I was 5, turning 6, in 1942 and stayed here for two years, which I went to first and second grade, and that’s where I think I was able to learn how to pronounce in English.  I went back to Cuba.  Had a grandfather who adored United States and lived here in Philadelphia … had become American citizen and then joined the Rough Riders and went back to Cuba and decided really he did want to stay where he was born and became back a Cuban citizen but never lost a love for United States.  So at the table, every time we had lunch, which is a custom at that time in Cuba, the whole family got together, and he made sure that we spoke English around the table.  I always went to bilingual schools, including a bilingual university, St. Thomas of Ilanova [?].  And I thank my grandfather every day, because I was able to come to United States and live here fifty years ago, and be able to speak the language.  Before that I was married to an American — and he was a Marine — and we traveled to different places of United States.  But I ended going back to Cuba, during his, er, during our marriage a couple a times.  Until the end, er, when we were here and Fidel took over, and we were never able to go back and we got divorced, and, uh, I moved on, and have always remembered my love for United States, and my love for my country.  I have children that speak Spanish and English, and I have some grandchildren that speak Spanish and English and some are having a little bit of difficulty. But I really believe being bilingual has been a blessing that my family bestowed upon me.  [She then speaks the first paragraph of “Comma Gets a Cure,” which she translated into Spanish.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/03/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

As you hear, the subject’s English has very little Spanish accent. I hear some instances where she devoices some final and medial voiced consonants. She pronounces “Comma” using the Spanish vowel in the first syllable. Some NURSE words have a little Latin flavor. Her rhythm has something of the even, equal distribution of stress that characterizes some Spanish dialects.

COMMENTARY BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/03/2009

The archive provides:

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  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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