Egypt 5

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 37

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/06/1979

PLACE OF BIRTH: Cairo, Egypt

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Egyptian

OCCUPATION: owner of a gift shop

EDUCATION: bachelor’s degree in accounting

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

He lived in Rome for about a year and a half.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

He speaks fluent French and knows a bit of Italian, Russian, and Spanish. He also holds a diploma in Computerized Accounting from the University of Arizona Online. As far as different influences on his Arabic go, he lived in Alexandria and a couple of other locations on the Sinai Peninsula for more than six months.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Sarah Maria Nichols

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/02/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

First Revolution: Everybody was so happy to have it. Eh, it was very hard time; was very de-difficult. Eh, we were so happy to have it because the Regime was have to change; it was too bad, the situation of economy and everything. And after we started, the problem was the Brotherhood — when they jump over, they come after the Revolution joined us. We wasn’t think they will make any problems, but was the time find out they was the problem, not the, not the police. So we, we kept, uh, we kept together, yani [Egyptian slang equivalent to “like”] we keep working together to, to succeed this Revolution.

After a while, the Brotherhood jump over and kick all the Revolution people out of the square, and they take control of the square. And that was the beginning of destroying this country, actually. So everybody was waiting; they was thinking the Brotherhood will give us hope; maybe they suffered in a lot before, so they will do something good for this country. After a while, we find out they work for themself [sic]. And that makes us feel sorry we made this Revolution, after they take over. So, and we feel sorry we kicked Mubarak out because we think he was OK, but he wasn’t know how to rule it at the end of his time. Uh, we ke-we-we-we-we was so patient until we make papers everybody should sign on it, that say we need another Revolution, we should be against the Brotherhood; they was so strong, so organized, so many, and we was few. And so everybody sign this paper; we have like twenty million persons sign on this paper, and we start the next Revolution. That was a very nice one, actually, because the Army was protect us, the police was protect us; uh, they was with us. They also want to get rid of the Brotherhood; they know they will do something bad. And that was the beginning of the next Revolution.

So, we was little scared in the next Revolution because wasn’t know what was going to happen, but was so scared from Brotherhood, and that was a big reason push us to make this ‘nother Revolution. And it succeed, was good, which was the President that was very good time; now we suffering because the price is going crazy, but we don’t know what to do because that’s the situation, you know, every we-we look about at all the [unclear] around us, we see how much they suffering. Because they, they didn’t protect their country. So we always feeling scared to do another Revolution because if this happen — if third Revolution happen — that’s mean the end of Egypt. Everybody understand this reason. Even if they s-complain about the prices, they know this will happen if we make third Revolution, this country will be over so … everybody try to hang out and see what will happen. We hope good things happen.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Sarah Maria Nichols

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/08/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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