England 17

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 51

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1959

PLACE OF BIRTH: Liverpool, Merseyside

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: white

OCCUPATION: cashier, cook

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Lise Olson

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/07/2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

And I have two children; um, one daughter’s just come 18. Um, I have a son who’s 21, and you’ve met me daughter because she’s waiting [unclear] in LIPA [Liverpool Institute for the Performing Arts].  She just got, she’s just got a new job; she’s left LIPA now and got a new job at, um, Liverpool airport as a nail technician. She’s really over the moon because that’s what she’s always wanted to do.  And me son works for a removal company. He’s not too happy with his job but it’s a job. Um, I work in LIPA; been here for, like, five years; it’s it’s a nice job; people are lovely.  Um, we live up the road not far from LIPA about five minutes, um, an old three bedroom terrace house.  It’s quiet, nice area; it’s OK. It has its ups and downs.  We’ve been in this house about twelve years; um, think I’m going to stay there for the rest of me life, because it’s cozy; it’s, you know, feels right to be there. Um, I don’t know about staying in me job; I don’t know whether I’d like to leave or you know, sometimes you think, ah, feel like a change other times you think just stay.  Um, I’d like to go on holiday next year; I would really like to go to the States.  Yeah, that’s me ambition, to get to New York, um, but I don’t really know.  Gary’s after me to go to Ireland; he thinks it would be a good idea if me, him, and his mates, and somebody else went to Ireland for a weekend or, you know, little break, um but I’m not too sure about that.  I use to work with Gary once again; um, that’s how I really become to come to LIPA, because we both worked in the same unit, and then he decided he wanted a change cause he got itchy feet.  And then he came here and asked me, couple of months later did I want to come.  Um, in me old job I was assistant cook, Gary was the chef.  I was there for like, seven years; um, enjoyed it, as I say.  Um, but it was nice to have the change; I was very unsure about coming here.  But, um, you know it was a change of job and a change of job in the job.  I’ve always been in catering, but, um, I was assistant cook; now I’m a cashier here, which I’m away from the cooking side.  But I don’t mind cooking now and again, but it’s not nice when people complain, you know, “This is not right, and that’s not right,” and you can’t please everybody, can you.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Dave Beals

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/02/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject was nervous during the recording; nonetheless, this soft-spoken Liverpudlian highlights a non-stereotyped version of a “well spoken” scouser.

COMMENTARY BY: Lise Olson

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/07/2000

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