England 61

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 27

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1978

PLACE OF BIRTH: Salford, near Manchester

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: N/A

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: Subject was attending college in California when recorded.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has lived in Ireland and also in the United States, while going to school in California.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Alex Reimers (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

[Name of subject edited] … from Manchester, North England. Ireland. Lived in Limerick, had a family over there, and a little bit in Birmingham in the Midlands, but not too long. I am a student at Cal State Fullerton. Um … probably the rise of Adolph Hitler. Nineteen thirty-three to forty-five. Just so different how he manipulated the people, how people can be brainwashed and that affected the world, really what a bastard he was … Umm, football’s a universal game, [?] But, uh, the fans, especially for people that go to watch the games live, it’s more a lifestyle than a sport. Where you work all week, and then one a day a week you actually get to go out and do something that’s out of the ordinary. Watch to make exciting, and then go back to a boring job and wait another week. Most of the teams turned up hung over, some still drunk, our team especially. Umm, and then we got hammered, two – one. Cause nobody could foot the football. We’re all crap. Pretty much. You know, the English. English, Irish, Scottish. Everyone turns up drunk, so. Umm, bit of a farce. Oh, it’s fun. Afterwards, we go out for a drink, and, you know, continue on. Yep, a lot of injuries. Terrible pitches over here. Really bad fields. It’s so dry. Back home it’s all wet. There’s a lot of grass. Umm, two-thousand three. Christmas, two-thousand three. Yeh, for Christmas. I try and get back every year. Just depends. Depends how busy I am, or if they come out here, which they usually do. We meet in New York. Shop. Pretty much. Get their Christmas presents. The cold weather, uh, drink, go in all the bars. Just meet up. Just, half way for everyone, so. It’s easier. And they like going to New York cause the prices in New York are a lot cheaper than they are in England. It’s about, it’s one point eight seven, I think. Pound to the dollar. So the money doubles … so, and the prices are so low. They just don’t match. Nike stuff, Armani stuff, Canal Street. Where we’re from, huge label. That’s what the culture is over there. The bigger the label the better the clothes. Especially, you don’t, you have it over here, you don’t have it over here. It’s called Stone Island. It’s like a real big make in England. [? – wool jumpers] You don’t need them over here, especially in California. But that’s like a huge name, Stone Island. You see them come over here with them, and they go back with Armani … sell ’em off.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Alex Reimers (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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