England 75

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Westminster, London

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: black, Chinese and mixed race

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: some university

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was raised in Fulham and lived in Trinidad for a year when young.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject is currently studying at WAC College for the Performing Arts in London. His mother is mixed race, and his grandmother is Chinese. He was fluent in Mandarin Chinese when younger.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Marina Tyndall

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 18/01/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Hi. I was born in Westminster. I grew up in Fulham, er, from, from birth up until 18, before I left home. Er, during growing up, I moved to Trinidad for a year. Things that have influenced me: Er, my grandmother is full Chinese; when we were younger we used to speak, er, full Mandarin; er, I actually gave up speaking Mandarin or kind of refused to speak it because of being bullied, erm. When we moved to Trinidad for a year; I would have been about 12 or 13, erm, and the accent obviously rubbed off on me, erm, and so myself and my younger niece who lived with, erm, us like she was my sister; we erm, we both had these full-blown Trindad-uh-Trinidadian accents, which I actually really wanted to keep hold of. Erm, I love it as an accent; it’s warm, it’s rounded, erm, and I have I have a bit of a biased opinion, but I think it’s the most kind of beautiful accent out of the West Indian accents that are there. My, erm, national heritage, I would say I’m black British, erm, but my mum is a complete cocktail of things: She’s Spanish, she’s Indian, she’s Chinese, and she’s black; my dad is of Nigerian descent, erm, don’t speak any Nigerian languages or dialects. Erm, I think my accent’s been changed a lot because of growing up in Fulham, it’s probably generally a middle-class area, er, but my parents have sent me to a range of schools. Erm, I was a somewhat mischievous teenager ‘cause all I wanted to do was dance and sing but, erm, don’t think they saw that as the thing for me. So they chucked me to, they sent me to boarding school for a while, erm, but I was shortly suspended for being very naughty indeed, and then I went to another school and a local school, erm, but I’ll wrap up quickly. Erm, what’s affected me? Just being in a range of different situations and travelling round a hell of a lot and being in so many different places in London. So, yeah, that’s it. Bye! [laughter]

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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