Florida 5

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1987

PLACE OF BIRTH: Boca Raton, Florida

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: When recorded, subject was a public communications major at university.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has lived in south Florida her whole life so her sample of the dialect of the region is quite reliable.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Adam Rælson

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/09/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I am a public-communications major at Florida Atlantic University. That’s located in Boca Raton. I am currently living, um, 20 minutes south of there. I take I-95 back and forth. Um, because FAU is right off I-95, it’s, it’s just east of there, and I live right off I-95 as well. There is another highway which I could take, the Turnpike, but that would be completely out of my way. Um, 20 minutes, 25 minutes, it’s not, it’s not a huge ordeal, but, um, traffic can be pretty bad in the morning, rush hour definitely. And coming home at around 4 or 5 o’clock. Gas can also get expensive coming back and forth, although now gas prices are pretty decent, I have to say. Um, when I go to the gas station, I, pay for gas. I usually use my, my debit card and, and you know, I usually use regular gas and put it in my gas tank – make sure the engine’s off. Um, and, I pump it and fill it. Pretty much I always fill it up, um, all the way so I don’t have to make as many trips to the gas station. I try not to drive on empty at all. The classes I’m currently taking at FAU are, um, Communication, Gender, and Language. I’m taking Ethnicity and Communication. I’m taking Small-Group Processes. And I’m also taking a sociology class, um, Human Sexuality and Social Change. Um, I like my classes a lot right now. It’s about fifteen credits of classes I’m taking. Um, my teachers can be, seem a little hard, but they’re, I think, I think they’re, they’re really good. And, oh also I’m taking Mass Communication Theory as well. That’s, that’s another class that I, I definitely need to take. But I’m really enjoying the semester so far. Next semester I hope to take up an internship of of some sort. Whether it’s working for a news station or something along those lines.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Adam Rælson

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/09/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject is a white female who has lived in South Florida her whole life, so her sample of the dialect of the region is quite reliable. She uses the terms “I-95” to refer to the interstate and uses the term “highway” as opposed to “freeway” or even “interstate” itself. When referring to Florida’s Turnpike, she says “the turnpike” rather than a “toll road.” Though she said “pump gas” once, she used “fill gas” twice, making me think that would be the more natural term for her to use. In the term “veterinary,” she does not pronounce the second “e” but combines the “t” and first “r” sounds. She has a very rounded /D/, especially before the letter “r,” giving her a typical South Floridian pronunciation of her own home state.

COMMENTARY BY: Adam Rælson

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/09/2007

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.