Florida 7

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 42

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 13/11/1966

PLACE OF BIRTH: Jacksonville, Florida

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: actor

EDUCATION: bachelor of arts

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Speaker was born and raised in Jacksonville, in northeast Florida. English is his only language. At the time of recording, he had lived in Panama City, Florida (two years); Gainesville, Florida (two years); Atlanta, Georgia (six years); Chicago, Illinois (two years); and most recently in Hoboken, New Jersey (part of the New York City metropolitan area), for four years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Amy Stoller

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 13/11/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Yeah, I sure do, my Mom taught me how to cook, as a matter of fact, when I got old enough to … I don’t know, probably 10 … my Mom was teaching me how to cook, clean the kitchen, bake, and so that some of that responsibility would then, you know, fall on me, she would assign me — one day a week I would have to prepare the meal. As a … youth, and uh — so that — allowed me to, when I, you know, got, got away from home, to be able to cook, and … and I like, I lo— actually love to cook? I just hate to clean up!

TRANSCRIBED BY: Amy Stoller

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/10/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Speaker is fully rhotic, with a lightly bunched Vowel R [ɚ, ɝ]. (There are not, as I write this, universally accepted symbols for bunched (molar, braced) r.)

Full merger in Mary-merry-marry, all pronounced [ˈmɛɚi]. Ex: Sarah Perry [ˈsɛɚə ˈpɛɚɪ]; territory [ˈtɛɚətoɚi]; unsanitary [ʌnsæənɪtɛɚɪ]; Mary Harrison [ˌmɛɚi ˈheɚɪ̆sən].

Full merger in hurry-furry [ˈhɝɪ, fɝi].

Florida-orange words mostly pronounced with [ɔɚ]. Ex: porridge [ˈpɔɚɪʤ]. Note that sorry is [ˈsɑɚɪ].

Note also: mirror [miɚɚ]; her a relaxing [hɝɪˈlæksɪŋ].

happY word endinɡs ranɡe from i to ɪ: Perry [ˈpɛɚɪ]; sorry [sɑɚɪ]; very happy [vɛɚi hæpɪ].

MOUTH [æ̝ːŏ].

GOAT [əou, ʌʊ].

THOUGHT/CLOTH [ɒʊ].

CHOICE [ɔə].

First element of the PRICE diphthong is sometimes very long, with an especially short second element [aːɪ̆]: liking; like; implied, right; private; surprising; tried, five. The words side and times are pronounced with monophthong [aː]. There does not seem to be a clear connection between the varying sounds in this PRICE set and whether a closing consonant is voiceless, voiced, or absent.

Final /t/ frequently glottaled before vowels as well as consonants: jacket, picked; kit and.

GOOSE has front onɡlide: goose [ɡɪ̆uːs]; huge [hɪˑuˑʤ].

No PIN/PEN distinction: then [ðɪn]; sentimental [ˌsɪntəˈmɪntʊ], expensive [ɪxˈpɪnsɪv], penicillin [ˌpɪnɪˈsɪɫɪn]; ten, however, is [tɛn].

OTHER NOTABLE PRONUNCIATIONS:

from the vet [fm̩ðˈvɛt]

sufferinɡ from a rare [ˈsʌfɹn̩ fm̩əɹeɚ]

North Square [nɔɚskwɛɚ]

tune to her [ˈtɪundəˌhɝ]

diagnosis three syllables [daɪ̯ːɡˈnoʊ.sɪs]

lawyer [ˈlɑːjɚ]

I don’t know, probably [aəʊˈnʌʊ, ˈprɑbi]

COMMENTARY BY: Amy Stoller

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/10/2013

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