France 15

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 44

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/09/1972

PLACE OF BIRTH: Sainte-Adresse (Normandy)

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian/French

OCCUPATION: professor, translator, and writer

EDUCATION: Ph.D

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was raised in Sainte-Adresse in Normandy but attended university in Paris. In 2000, at the age of 28, she moved to Miami, Florida, United States, where she lived for seven years. Then, in 2007, at the age of 35, she moved to Los Angeles, California, United States, where she was still living at the time of this interview.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject’s grandfather is Spanish.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Casey Bowen (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/04/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Um, my childhood was not so crazy. Uh, I grew up in a very traditional family, uh, happy family, uh, and what it was to be a 10-year-old in France: I remember actually, uh, having a lot of time to play, to play outside, uh, outdoors with my friends. I remember that I wanted to be first, uh, candy-shop, uh, lady. (Can you say that? OK). But then very rapidly I thought there was already some sort of social pressure on me to maybe pick up another job. Um, so I wanted to become I think around the age of 11, 12, um, an etymologist, which sounds very technical, but I love Latin. I love translating Latin into French. I had just a passion for words at a very early age, uh, before even 10, so I wanted to, to work with words at a very young age; I think it was already something that was working in my mind. And, you know, then, I was just reading this morning which was fresh: the four millions in L.A. So Paris is about actually, if you include the suburbs, very close to that — um, you know, very similar in the sense of really high-price real estate, uh, job, uh, opportunities being, uh, maybe more important as you know in small cities, pollution, density, but also the other good size is that you have a very intense social life. Uh, I would say there’s one major difference is that cities are walkable city; uh, Paris is a walkable city, so L.A. is not. And that’s what I, as a European and as a French Parisian woman, I miss the most to be able to enjoy those long walks for hours. I just come back from New York City this weekend, and I, I just feel that vibe of Paris in New York, you know: You walk to walk for hours.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Casey Bowen (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/04/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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