France 9

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 25

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1980

PLACE OF BIRTH: Évreux, Normandy, France

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: French (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: Ph.D. student

EDUCATION: university

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Before moving to the United States, his longest stay outside France was a one-month visit to London, England.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

His father and sister are English teachers. He also learned British English in school. (The subject does not speak with the uvular fricative “r” but makes a clear effort to pronounce the alveolar approximate.)

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Rebekah Maggor

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 08/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Évreux in France in Normandy, ah, which is a very beautiful region near Paris. And, ah, it’s where I grew up, actually. And then I studied in Paris and then in Vion, which is 500 kilometers away from Paris. Um, my father and my sister are English teachers, so … and I have family in America, so that’s why I have been exposed to English. That’s, um, ah … I have also studied English at school. Ah, I went to England for … and I stayed there for one month, ah, 6, 7 years ago. And, um, now, ah, I study history, um, at, ah, at Paris at the Sorbonne. And I, I have actually studied, ah, the French Revolution and, ah, the reception of the French Revolution in Europe and in America. So that’s why I’m in America now. I want to study French Revolution to, um, continue my research and, um, I, I’m going to teach French to undergraduate students. So, um … and I want to, to travel in America. I want to visit and I want to, to go to libraries, ah, to read most, ah, books — the most books that I can. Um, my brother, my brother has problem with his, ah, ears because, um, he used to, to listen to, ah, hard rock and heavy metal music and, ah, used to go to concerts and, ah, was a, a member of a band. Ah, he, he sang and, ah, that he didn’t know that it could hurt him. And, ah, after … when he was, ah, something like 20, 21, ah, he had a … all the high sounds hurt him. Noises hurt him and, ah, there is always a, a kind of ring, a bit, in his ears. So it’s, it’s a bit, it’s a big injury. It’s a big problem for him. Because he can not go to weddings parties. He cannot go to, ah, places … cannot stay in places where, ah, there’s, there are a lot of people, ah, where it, when it’s too crowded.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Mitchell Kelly

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/01/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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