Georgia 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 25

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 17/12/1985

PLACE OF BIRTH: Tifton, Georgia

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student and military veteran

EDUCATION: When recorded, subject was a sophomore in college.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject was born in Tifton, Georgia, which is in the southern part of the state. He was raised in Athens, Georgia, and then returned to Tifton to complete his high school education. He joined the Marine Corp, trained at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, and completed two tours of duty in Iraq.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Daydrie Hague

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/12/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, grew up in Athens, Georgia; not really a Bulldog’s fan though. Grew up in the sticks, I guess you would call it, back in the country. Me and my older sister, we used to go down to the creek and look for different rocks and Indian arrowheads and whatnot. And then, uh, there was this one Saturday; me and my cousin were on a four-wheeler, I think I was in seventh grade at the time. And, uh, we went, we hit this hill and flew up in the air, and I was holding on to the four-wheeler wrong so I was just, so it broke my arm in two places. So I remember that; those were always good times, and then, um, I was really big in sports, played a lot of football growin’ up, on the wrestlin’ team, then I started playin’ golf, probably around my sophomore year in high school. And then uh, changed schools my senior year, ’cause I could get more college prep classes down in Tifton, where I was born, so I transferred down to Tifton County High School, where I graduated from. I did a year of college at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, and then, you know I thought this whole college thing wasn’t for me. So I decided to join the Marine Corps, so I ended up doing that for four years, two tours of Iraq, and then, uh, I was like yep, it’s about time I get back in college, so, now I’m a theatre major at Auburn University, havin’ a blast; I love it, it’s a great program. But, uh, that’s about it.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Daydrie Hague

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/06/2011

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

The subject’s speech is characterized by very relaxed articulation and linkage. There appears to be very little muscularity in the use of the lips. The subject uses his lower register almost exclusively and uses duration of vowel sounds as a means of stress. He employs the characteristic drawl, hard “r” as in “arm,” and a neutral onset on his “ou” and “u” vowels, as in “gəʋs.” The subject is pretty consistent in the monothongalization of the long “i,” so you hear “prɑs” for price, “tɑp” for type, etc. “Str” is commonly heard as “shtr” (ʃtr), so you hear “shtrut” for “strut,” etc. The resonant focus is toward the back of the mouth.

COMMENTARY BY: Daydrie Hague

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/12/2010

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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