Guadeloupe 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 44

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 16/01/1971

PLACE OF BIRTH: Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: African-Caribbean

OCCUPATION: professor

EDUCATION: Ph.D. in history from the University of Paris Sorbonne

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

This speaker was born and raised in Guadeloupe and lived there until the age of 17. He then lived in Paris and Madrid from ages 17 to 28. He lived in Memphis, Tennessee, in the United States, from ages 28 to 30, and has lived in Fullerton, California, ever since.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/03/2015

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, I originally speak two languages: uh, Creole (Guadeloupean Creole, the Guadeloupean version of Creole) and, uh, and, French — and Spanish. It’s, um, it’s, uh, one of the islands of the, er, eastern Caribbean chain; it’s, er, it’s a volcanic island, um, um, at the same time an island with, er, very much geographical and climatic diversity. Um, it’s, um, em — much of the island is, uh, lush um, um, covered by a very thick forest. In another part is, uh, relatively dry, with no rivers; um, it’s essentially, um, a savannah. So, it’s, er, quite a bit of diversity. Um, and, um, and, um, and natural diversity and animals and, of course, um, with, er, with the people, um, that’s diverse also; most people, of course, are descendants of Africans brought there, um, under slavery. But then we have, er, relatively important Indian population as well — Indians from, uh, from India, uh, who came there, um, in the nineteenth century after slavery was abolished. And, uh, who were taken there by, er, former slave masters to, uh, make sure that, uh, their ex-slaves would not, uh, negotiate, uh, good salaries. So, uh, Indians were taken there as strike breakers. And, er, so, um, we have, er, quite a bit very important Lebanese community as well. Um, Lebanese — former Lebanese — and Syrian Christians most of the time, um, who came there again in nineteenth century [or] early twentieth century, so we’re quite a diverse population. Whites of course, but the very, very tiny minority descendants of, er, of, er, of the very first French and … but not only French — Dutch settlers also came, um, to, to the area, so it’s a quite, er, diverse people, diverse population.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Wyn Moreno (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/12/2015

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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