Hawaii 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1980

PLACE OF BIRTH: Kane’ohe/Kahalu’u, Oahu, Hawaii

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: N/A

OCCUPATION: student and tour guide

EDUCATION: When recorded, subject was a college student.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Cori Harris and Craig Ferre

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/04/2003

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I stay going to school a- at Brigham Young University of Hawaii. My major is Hawaiian Studies and, um, Psychology, but I just changed it to Secondary Education, and I minor in Spanish. I, I’m decide for come to this school about three years ago, uh, because they had a, they had a graphics program here, but they, they kicked it out, so I’m transferring now. Eh, I don’t like that idea, but I’m gonna have to do it anyways. I think I’m gonna transfer to the University of Hawaii campus, and either Manoa or over on the Big Island. On the Big Island, they — that’s where I live, so I can go for cheap, but, uh, in Manoa they got a better program than the one on the Big Island. Uh, right now I work at, uh, PCC, as a tour guide, on canoes. I give tours, not wearing much clothes, but it’s cool. I like it, it’s a fun job. Um, I give tours in Spanish and in English. For fun, yeah, I go surf all the time. At the North Shore, Pipeline, wherevers. And I also like to, sometimes, just go camping, hang out with friends, or go, go hiking up in the woods, up on the top. I ride a, a Mike Stewart Mach — Mach 3. It’s, eh, it’s about 42 inches, 42 by 33. Yeah, it’s a body — it’s a boogie board. I go to Pipe sometimes, but then, a better wave is at V’lan’. I guarantee there’s more better surfing at V’lan’. If you’d, uh, there’s some good hikes out here, get Molaikoana, get Laie Falls, get Stairway to Heaven, those [unclear], but I prefer the Big Island, ’cause get valleys, and — over here, not much valleys. Only get the, the long mountain ranges. Out on the Big Island you get… snow, sometimes, or on the other side, in Kona I get — it’s all desert. But mostly, um, on my side, in Hilo, it’s always raining but get good surf, so I like that. Not much sharks. Volcano Kilauea, that’s out in, uh, a place called Puna on the Big Island, and, uh, it’s about 45 minutes from my house. When I was a little kid, I saw the, the lava flow. I went to touch it, but my mom’s like, “Don’t do it,” so I never [Laughter]. (Uh) But, ever since then, every night if I like see the volcano, I just go to the end of my street. I live right in back o’ the vol– the airport. And so, like around nine o’clock, when there’s no airplanes coming in, I go to the airport and watch, across the horizon. There’s like a little red bump — it looks like a pimple, on the night skyline. It’s pretty exciting. It’s pretty cool. I like it. You know Hot Water Pond? Out by the volcano, ’cause of the volcano there’s underwater vents, an- and there — there’s Hot Water Pond. Us go there every night. Well, during the summer about nine o’clock, when it’s really cold, but it’s really nice over there. The moon stay shining and just go out. Heck, jump in naked, whatever. ‘S good fun. No one ever understood me. The way I talked. And so, I thought now that I speak proper English. But it helped out, because in pidgin, when you talk pidgin, it’s as if you’re speaking Spanish English, in a way. So when I was learning how to speak Spanish, I never knew how for speak Spanish before I went there. So I got there, and everyone was like, “Oh, I can’t understand you what you stay saying in English.” And I’m like, “OK.” So I started learning Spanish, and all the Hispanic guys thought I was — I was a native, the way that I talked. That was pretty funny. Mahalo.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/02/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.