Hawaii 2a

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1980

PLACE OF BIRTH: Kane’ohe/Kahalu’u, Oahu, Hawaii

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Polynesian/Caucasian

OCCUPATION: tour guide

EDUCATION: high school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Jared Bodine and Craig Ferre

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/04/2003

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

[2A contains the reading and some unscripted speech. That unscripted speech is transcribed here. See 2B for a discussion, by this same subject, of Hawaiian language.] My dad’s side of the family is originally from, uh, Molokai, and, uh, our — the name Kimokeo, was actually — before it was Kekahuna, which was, like, the sorcerer, but when the Christians came to Hawaii, um, eh, uh, they kind of encouraged them to, like, break away from the name Kekahuna, because it had like ties to the Hawaiian religion, so they changed their name to Kimokeo, which means Timothy. So — which is a Bible name — so they changed the name, and, uh, our whole family: That side of the family is all messed up ’cause, like — no, for real, ’cause da kine is like —- um, there’s, like, fou– li– like once you go past, like, four generations, you cannot find– ’cause I found that they changed their name so many times, like, there’s Kimokeo, uh, Keo– uh, Kaleohanos. Now this is all from, like, one family, so they all changed their names to, like, different names. It woulda helped if, like, they all changed their names to, like, the same name. So one is Kimokeo, one is Kaleohano, one is Kai– uh, Kaiiwi, and so, like, our family genealogy’s all screwed up, that side. And, uh, my mom’s side is from, uh, Scotland. Originally, long time ago, back in the days. And Denmark. Haole is usually someone who is, like, full Caucasian, but there’s a different — there’s like — heh, this sounds pretty weird, but there’s like different classes of a like a haole person. ’Cause, like, for example, my mom is a haole person, and she’s from here, and she’s like lived here all her life, so it’s, like, local. There’s like the local haole, and then there’s the mainland haole, and then there’s people who just aren’t from here, kind of. Because, uh, it’s more a– any in Hawaii, anything that’s not Hawaiian is foreign, which is the haole, but you don’t really call a Samoan person haole. You know what I mean. And hapa is a — Hapa is when you’re mixed. Hapa in Hawaiian means half, so, but it’s not necessarily half, it, or part. So it’s like you’re part, kinda like poi dog, like, mixed in all together. I was born in Kaneohe, but when I was 2, we moved to Kahaluu, which is still in the district of Kaneohe, but it’s more towards Laie side. And, uh, it’s a little more country. It’s about ten minutes from the Kaneohe town, so I like it. I like it better, actually, because it’s a little more country, not as city. You know what I mean. In our school, everybody would say stuff like, “Oh, spahk ya later.” [Interviewer: What’s that mean?] Like, see you later. I don’t know, spahk ya later. And then, uh, I don’t know, uh, say, uh, I dunno, I’m not — I dunno, I never did think of — usually it just comes out naturally, I don’t really think about [laughing] the stuff I say. I play music, in Waikiki with my dad, and we play Hawaiian music. Think I answered all o’ that already. I play ukulele, guitar and bass, and sh– And sing with my dad, we do Hawaiian songs mainly. With a little bit of country, and a little bit of rock.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/06/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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