Hawaii 2b

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1980

PLACE OF BIRTH: Kane’ohe/Kahalu’u, Oahu, Hawaii

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Polynesian/Caucasian

OCCUPATION: tour guide

EDUCATION: high school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Jared Bodine and Craig Ferre

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/04/2003

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

[See 2A for this subject’s scripted and main unscripted speech. Recording 2B, which is transcribed below, contains a discussion of Hawaiian language.] Something that’s funny is that I always thought that those words were English, till I was like seventh grade. I totally thought that pau was a English word, and I thought puka was a English word too. An’ I – an’ I remember like going to the mainland and visiting my cousin, an’ I was, like, “Oh, your shirt has a puka,” an’ they’d be like, “What? A puka?” An’ I was, like, “Yeah, it has a puka in it.” An’ it was, like, “What’s a puka?” An’ I used to think like they were dumb or somethin’. I was, like, “You’re so dumb.  You don’t even know what a puka is.”  An’ they’re li–  I’m serious.  I totally thought those were English words for the longest time and a half.  But, I proved to be the dumb one.  An’ then I told my mom, an’ I’m, like, “They don’t even know what puka is.” An’ she’s, like, “That’s a Hawaiian word.”  An’ I was like, “Oh, oh.  Oops.”  Mistake.  The thing is that… I can, a lot of times I talk according to my environment too.  [Interviewer:  Yeah.]  Like, if I’m talking to someone who’s full out, like going pidgin on me.  It just happen– happened after.  This, like, boom, I’m there. But it’s almost like the way I– And the communication, like, if I am talking to someone who doesn’t really talk pidgin, then I just, I don’ wanna talk for me to talk like full out, an’ get all bus’ on ’em.  See, because, when I read this story, I– I just tried to read it normal, like how you said, like how I would read it, but I re– really read it, really r– like bad.  Or I could read it– I probably coulda read it a lot better, like, there’s words that, I know, like, I wouldn’t say it like that unless my English teacher is listening.  And like I’m, like, for example, like, the words like, like, because we have, like, this whole lesson in high school about how Hawaiian kids don’t talk good English.  [Laughs]  I’m serious, and it’s really funny, like, we have to learn to say stuff like, it’s not whale, it’s whale [emphasizes h], and it’s white.  And, it’s not tree [has ch sound], it’s tree.  You know, stuff like that, but I never did say that, so I just read it how I talk [Interviewer: That’s cool.] So tree, try, whatever.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/06/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

This is the same subject as 2A.

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.