Illinois 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: N/A

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Ottawa, Illinois

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: retired computer analyst

EDUCATION: master’s degree in computer science and a bachelor’s in English

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in Bloomington and Frankfort, Illinois, for short periods, but lived and worked in Chicago area most of his adult life.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

He is married to subject Illinois 2.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 1999

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Earlville, or I was born in Ottawa, Illinois, near Earlville, where I was raised for the first eighteen years of my life. My dad was a farmer and, uh, he raised, uh, corn, beans and oats mostly and hay; had a few cattle, and I helped him on that, uh, endeavor as well as, uh, going to school, uh, grade school, high school in Earlville. And, uh, later I went to college at Illinois State University in Normal, Illinois, had a degree in English with a ma- or a degree, a bachelor’s degree with a major in English and a minor in music. And later took some music training at Illinois Wesleyan University and finally, uh, got a degree at uh, a master’s degree in computer science at Northern Illinois University De Kalb in 1976. And I spent my, uh, career, most of my career as a computer programmer, systems analyst, computer trainer and, uh, Web developer. And, uh, first memory: The first memory that I think that I have, and I’m not, it’s indistinct but I think it would be, uh, looking up out of a baby basket at a bunch of people looking over the edge and being at a party or something and then all the people would disappear and I would hear noise in the background and I would be alone there in the baby basket, uh waiting for somebody else to look over the edge, I guess. And, uh, on the farm, uh, maybe I could tell a couple of memories on the farm, uh, I yu, I uh, first started driving our, our Farm-all tractor, it was a “B” model; it was a very small tractor and that’s what I learned on and I would pull the hay bailer, and I remember, uh, pulling my dad and my uncle, they were, they would be back pulling bales out of the hay bailer and putting them on the ra- on the uh, flat rack to take into the mow and, uh, my touch on the clutch was not all that good, and sometimes I would jerk the clutch out and they would, uh not fall, but they would be, uh, stumbling for ber- stumbling for balance and I would get a little chewing out for that. Um, I had, uh, hay fever and, uh, was allergic to grain dust, so I was not a good fit for being a farmer, and so after many tight chests and many, uh, many times of, uh, uh, having reactions to that sort of thing, I realized that I would have to do something besides farming, which was good because I didn’t like farming too much anyway.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 1999

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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