Illinois 12

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 65

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/01/1947

PLACE OF BIRTH: Chicago

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Irish-American

OCCUPATION: retired

EDUCATION:  three years of college

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born and raised on the south side of Chicago (Beverly), lived in New Mexico for a few years in her 30s, and then returned to Chicago.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 23/06/2012

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Who, did you make that up? Whoa. That is amazing. So, interesting just to learn about the dialects or whatever because whatever you call this — the way I speak because it really wasn’t until you pointed it out that, uh. I mean I knew I did, but like when you see it on Saturday Night Live, it seems so exaggerated, you know? But it’s exactly. And I can remember, uh, John and I going to live in Virginia for a while, while he was playing ball. And I would hang out with the wives of the other players, you know? And we had kind of a going-away party at the end of the season or something. And I don’t know — I think it was probably, well somebody said something about accents. And these were, lot of the women were Southern. And I was saying that how it was the first time I had really had to speak so regular, at regular or daily basis with someone who had a different accent. And they just fell off their chairs laughing, you know? That I thought they had an accent. And that I think was the first I knew. Oh OK, but I actually think I speak like the TV announcers, you know? Except that Mike teases me so bad. No, my son Mike. Oh, he was delighted to hear that you were. I don’t, how did Kay and I get you going on that, uh, doing ’cause you did not want to imitate us. But particularly, yea. So, uh, that was the first time I had heard Wabash. Yeah, Wabash, a little see you can, you can even point out it’s. I don’t know if there’s a fourth. There must be. There’s an eighth. But, great. Oh, all done.

TRANSCRIBED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 19/06/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.