Illinois 14

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 65

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 01/01/1950

PLACE OF BIRTH: Herrin, Illinois (southern Illinois)

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: retired coal miner

EDUCATION: college degree

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in St. Louis, Missouri, for one year when he was in his twenties.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Amelia Morse Kolkmeyer

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 27/01/2015

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, that ends that story. Uh, this winter I’m gonna just kinda take it easy and I’m gonna rejuvenate and revitalize some old fishing plugs that has been in my family for generations. After I had purchased the necessary equipment to repair these, uh, fishing plugs, paints, hooks, eyelets, and valance, I went at this task very easily with a set of tweezers, a magnifying glass, and a small paint brush. Through time and effort, and a few cuss words now and then, I was able to restore one of the prize fishing lures that my father possessed back in the 1950s, a lucky thirteen. It truly was lucky; my older brother had caught a five-pound bass on it at the age of 10. Myself, I had caught a nine-pound bass on it in my youth also. Well, I don’t know what more to say about restoring fishing plugs; if one has the time, the equipment, the effort, and a good dialect of, uh, heathenistic [sic] cuss words, this task can formed easily on a cold winter day. Now as far as fly-fishing and retying flies in my youth, I gave that up long time back. The cuss words outnumbered my ability to tie the flies properly, so I just continued to purchase them. However, this successful venture into restoration of ancient, vital, sentimental fishing plugs was quite successful. I do not know if I will keep these plugs, pass ‘em on to another generation, put ‘em in a flea market, or use ‘em as a prop in preaching the need to have more concentration and less cussing at my local church.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Amelia Morse Kolkmeyer

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 01/02/2015

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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