Illinois 5

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples.  IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 18

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Lynwood, Illinois

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian (Greek)

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Eric Armstrong

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Uh, when I was, uh, younger, um, we’d go to the family dentist, and our family dentist’s name was Dr. Harry Richard Mole, and he’s — is a very, very jovial man. He had a big belly and he a — he wou — tried to make jokes while he was inspecting my teeth. But h- he had really, really bad breath, which is bizarre because this is a dentist; you know, why would he have bad breath; he should know better. And when he would get in close and — and he’d be talking it was — it was almost too much to take because, you know, yuh- you’re really breathing out of your nose because he’s working with your mouth, and one time when, uh, he was f- fiddling around with something by my throat, my gag reflexes reacted and I sm- smelled his breath and ended up throwing up all over his white smock, and, uh, which was insane, pretty crazy and m- my mom thought it was really funny, but, uh, she was embarrassed and we had to switch dentists. We live in Lynwood, which is right on the boarder of Munster, Indiana, which, uh, h- has caused a deep, hidden resentment for Indiana people. We really don’t like the people in Indiana; it’s the whole running gag; they say we can’t drive we say they can’t drive, and, uh, so, um, also, um, we live in kind of a it’s — it’s not the greatest neighborhood in the world, um, economic-wise, and it’s right next to, uh, little, little more better-off town, and there’s also a little — little resentment towards those people. I don’t know if it’s because they have it better-off or because of their attitudes towards us, and, you know, uh, maybe a little snobbish, stuck-up.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Shawn M. Muller

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject’s speech features the very “flat” sound that characterizes the American Midwest. Similar “flattened” sounds can be heard in other Northern cities, such as Detroit, Michigan, and Buffalo, New York.

COMMENTARY BY: Eric Armstrong

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.