India 7

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 23

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1979

PLACE OF BIRTH: Annan, in the state of Gujarat, India

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: N/A

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: Subject was attending college at the time of this interview.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was raised in Zambia in Africa, where she learned to speak English. She then moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in the United States, to attend college.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject’s time in Zambia means her accent is more closely associated with that country than with India. However, she is fluent in both Hindi and Murati.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Elizabeth Ahrens (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/12/2002

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in a town called Annan. It’s in the state of Gujarat in India. Um, after that when I was about 3 years old, uh, my family moved to Zambia in Africa and we live in the capital city, which is Lusaka, and I live there ever since. And when I was about 17, I came here to go to college, so … but, um I frequently visit India almost every other year so I haven’t really lost touch with my native background and uh as far as languages go I can speak my mother tongue which is Murati and I can speak the national language of India which is Hindi. Um, and then in Zambia they speak English and in India also English is like a second language so, um, that’s quite a common thing. So I learned how to speak English when I was really like, probably like four or five. And then, um, in Zambia they have other tribal languages but those are kind of hard to pick up um so but I mean I now a little bit to get around just to get by maybe and then once you live outside India it’s a little tougher like you lose a little bit of touch with your … like I can speak my language pretty fluently but I can’t read or write like it it sounds pretty strange but it’s a fact. OK, um, basically if you want to say, uh, “hello” you say “namaste” and usually do that with hands like that, and that’s in Hindi and if you want to say, um, “how are you?” like you would say “kei esei hou” basically and that’s in Hindi. In Murati, it’s almost the same instead of “namaste” you’d say “namascar.” And, uh, instead of “kei esei hou,” you’d say “kasa ahe.” Indians in Zambia basically have a … they might have a little bit of an African, um, tone to their speaking like they might speak, say their words a little different like let’s say the word like let’s say the word “carpenter” or maybe a person in Zambia would say like “carpenter,” but you’re, maybe a person in India would say it different: “carpenter.”

TRANSCRIBED BY: Elizabeth Ahrens (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Though fluent in English, she has just a trace of an Indian dialect. Only once does she not fully articulate the “th” sound. Her tone tends to rise at the end of words, and she drops the “d” sound in words like “and.” A strong “i” sound is apparent when she says “India” and “Hindi.”

If you are a dialect researcher, or an actor using this sample to develop your skill in the accent, please see my instruction manual at www.paulmeier.com. As the speaker in this sample is a unique individual, it is highly unlikely that she will conform to my analysis in every detail. But you will find it interesting and instructive to notice which of my “signature sounds” and “additional features” (always suggested only as commonly heard features of the accent) are widely used by most speakers of the accent or dialect, and which are subject to variation from individual to individual.

COMMENTARY BY: Elizabeth Ahrens and Paul Meier

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/12/2002 (amended 10/11/2016)

The archive provides:

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