India 8

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 27

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1979

PLACE OF BIRTH: Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Asian (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: quality-assurance analyst

EDUCATION: master’s degree in computer science

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in the United States (Nebraska and Minnesota) for four years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Telugu is the subject’s mother tongue.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Joseph Papke

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/02/2006

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

It’s in the south, and it’s a big city, um, it’s beautiful, and it has … we don’t have as many lakes as we have over here in Minneapolis, but we do have two which are pretty good and we have lots of parks and entertainment we have lots of theaters, movies, and … you … well, if you come over there you will have a lot of things to watch and…you…and there’s this big museum Salarjung museum. He was..he was kind of a nawob, a nawob is like a king, so, what he used to do is he used to collect all artifacts, historical stuff, and whatever he collected  he, he displayed it, and now it’s in a museum called Salarjung museum. All kinds of rare stuff, and, completely rare, you can’t see anywhere in the world, all the stuff you can see over there. But at home we don’t speak much English, we only talk in our mother tongue which is Telugu. In school, English is our first language; you have to talk in English, you can’t talk in your mother tongue. So we do have lots of languages, like we have twenty-five states, so we can say twenty-five languages. It’s the … beautiful thing, people of different languages still able to co-exist on our bad differences, that’s the beautiful thing of my country I really love. Other than that, rest of them like … we can’t date guys or anything, it’s like little bit conventional, I mean, kinds of weighty [unclear] over there. All my family is over there, no one is over here, just my uncle that’s it. And I was the first girl to come here, I’m the first one. I’m breaking all the traditions. They are really freaking out right now over there. [laughs]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Faith Harvey

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/02/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject shows an often clipped, staccato speech rate; some British English remnants, particularly in non-rhotic vowels; and some retroflex consonants: that, the, then, etc. (consistent change [ð] → [dʰ] or [ɖʰ]).

Specific observations
veterinary [v] → [w] or [β̥]
old [oʊ] → [ʌ], [d] → [ɖ]
of [əf]
territory [ˈte̞ɹʌˌtə̞ɹɪ]
very [v] → [ vʷ] approximant
start [sʈaˑʈ] non-rhotic remnant
job [dʒɑβ̥]
superb private [p] → [p̌] and [β̥]
north [naˑθ]
much [mʌʃ]
bowl [bɑl] or [β̥]
dress [s] → [s̆]
fleece [fli] slightest hint of [z]
official [ə] → [ʔo̜]
vet [vʷɛʈ]
mouth disease [θ] → [ɖ]
normally [ˈnaˑməlĭ]
bird non-rhotic remnant
to strut [t] → [ʈ]
thought [θ] → [ʈ]
had a [d] → [ɖ]
with [θ] → [t]
tire [t] → [ʈ]
bath [a]
managed [dʒ] → [ʒ]
cloth [θ] → barely sounded [ʈ]
diagnosis [oʊ] → [ʌˑ]
warned non-rhotic remnant
five [fʷaɪ]
can’t [kaˑnʈ]
thought [θ] → [ʈ]
lots of [l] → [ɭ]
parks [aˑ]
entertainment [ˌɪntə˞ˈteɪɳmɛɳʈ]
theaters [ʈʰiəʈə˞z]
over [owə˞] /r/ very lightly sounded
ŋabob [b] → [β]
to talk [ʈ]
can’t [kaˑnʈ]
over there [ovə͜ɖeɹ]

COMMENTARY BY: Joseph Papke, unicode trans. Dylan Paul

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/02/06

The archive provides:

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  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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