Iran 10

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 37

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/10/1968

PLACE OF BIRTH: Tehran, Iran

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Iranian (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: illustrator, graduate student

EDUCATION: undergraduate degree in graphic design, graduate degree in fine arts

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

At the time of the interview, subject had been living in the United States for an unspecified period of time.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject received a graduate degree from California State University, Fullerton, in California, in the United States.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Autumn Hymes (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I born in … Iran, and I raised in Tehran, which is capital city, and I’m 37 years old, and I attend school … back home in my country so I did my undergraduate in Azad University. In Tehran, and my major was graphic design.  [INTERVIEWER: TELL ME ABOUT A FAVORITE CHILDHOOD STORY.]  When I, I remember I was child I always hate eating meat. And … I remember one day my mom, as usual, she brought the food for us. I mean for me and my sister and put it on the table for each of us. … Then my mom she left the room and to bring other things and I grab my meat, and under the table I give it to my sister, and when she come back my mom said, “Oh good girl, you know, you are very nice.”… She was really happy I had my food, but obviously I didn’t.  [INTERVIEWER: TELL ME A STORY ABOUT ANYTHING YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE ABOUT YOUR COUNTRY.]  Well, it is not going to be a … happy story I’m telling right now but, about, all the woman in my country. Back home Iran, actually we don’t have any rights. And even you’re … educated so you’re not able to … continue … your education and go to, like a different level of education, and after even you graduate there … is no opportunities for you as woman to work for a company because they didn’t take you seriously and they are not going to pay you a start to abuse you in different way which is very sad, even though if you got married you don’t have right to raise your children, or even if you want to go to different country, you need your husband signature to let you go out of country; this is really ridiculous, and as I said, very disturbing in different level, and when even really have a happy life; and … so you want a divorce, you don’t have any rights to apply for the divorce; the man only the one who can apply for the divorce and you don’t have anything after divorce even your own child. … So you couldn’t really do anything. So it was really bad, and after all I was decided … to come to United States because it was my only choice, and I had tons of difficulty to come to here to get the visa cause, because of my governor and politics, which we have and, unfortunately, it is not really pleasant. They did even give me. … They didn’t give me a visa to come here. … After like, a, four times I apply in different ways, so they let me come here.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Autumn Hymes (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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