Iran 11

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 40

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1967

PLACE OF BIRTH: Iran

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Persian-Armenian

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in Germany for two years, and at the time of the interview had lived in the United States for 18 years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject has lived in Germany and the United States.  Subject speaks Farsi, English, Arabic and Armenian.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Lelliot

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

OK, I born and raised in Iran, OK, and then in age of 20 I left in Iran; I went for to Germany, for two years, and after that I came to United State.  First eighteen months I live in San Francisco and Redwood City, and after that I just moved to Los Angeles.  And I just stay over here it’s almost, it’s twenty years I’m living in United States now.  First language is Persia, it’s Farsi.  You talk Farsi and going school it’s a Farsi, but because we are Armenian at home it was talking Armenian.  And before the revolution in Iran the second language it’s over there it was English.  But after the revolution in Iran they change it and they make it Arabic.  That’s why we have to learn Arabic, Farsi, and sometimes Armenian.  Three language.  And when I was like, you know, until eighth grade I learned English, and after eighth grade I have to learn, because it’s revolution it’s happened I had to start to learning the Arabic language.  It is very complicated.  When you saying Armenia, the people they just looking okay Armenian, but it’s not like that, you know, and some people just a small percentage of the people they know it but that and they’re just asking you, “Armenian from where?”  Because all of us very different, you know.  And then you are explained that, “OK, I born and raised in Iran”, you know.  Or some people they say, “I’m Armenian from Armenia.  I came from Armenia.”  Or, “I’m Armenian from Russia!  You know, I just like born and raised in Russia and I just, I came from Russia.”  And it’s, it’s really difficult that sometimes people they don’t understand that and then they’re asking, “Oh my God, Armenia, but there’s so many different countries?”  Yeah.  Armenia is very small country and Armenian people there are not so many, and because of that war and all that genocide, which is it’s happened most of the Armenian people start to moving around to neighbor’s country.  And then suddenly all of us we gather over here to United State, being all Armenian, but it’s hard to living together understand each other because all of us like from different culture we came, and it’s, it’s completely difficult.  That’s why if you look, most of Armenian, Armenian from Iran, they stay together;  Armenian from Armenia, they are together; Armenian from Baghdad, or Syria, Beiruit, they are just like separate, and are like it’s hard for us to be together and it’s, it’s not easy.  OK, “Dear Jeremy, happy birthday to you, and I wishing you gonna have great and wonderful day.”  OK?

TRANSCRIBED BY: Elizabeth Terrell

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/07/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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