Iran 7

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 45

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1957

PLACE OF BIRTH: Tehran, Iran

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Iranian (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: Subject owns and runs a roofing company.

EDUCATION: He has a degree in architectural engineering from the University of Kansas.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

At the time of the interview, subject had lived in the United States for 24 years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

As a child, subject listened to American radio and watched basketball on American TV, learning some English from listening to the commentary.  At the time of the interview, subject lived in the United States.  In addition to English, subject speaks Farsi, and Spanish fluently, and can also speak a little Italian.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Alex Wolfson (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/12/2002

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Tehran; eh, I was raised in Tehran until I was 21. Then, uh, I was fortunate that I could come to United States to, uh, in the first place to get educated and had a chance and opportunity to stay here and live a life. I was mainly in Tehran most of my life. I went to northern part of Iran, which is, uhhh, uh, very wet area in terms of atmosphere and temperature as far as rainfalls and so forth. It’s a very nice and very pleasant area, somewhat like Oregon. And, uh, I was there several times. As far as other area of the country, no, I didn’t have a chance to travel much. First encounter, uh, well it may sounds kind of crazy, but when we were kids, always listened to the American and the, uh, American radio as well as watching the American programmings on TV. Mainly basketball. And every time they had the, uh, commentator going on about, you know the excit- exciting part of the game, he kind of sounded like this: wah, wah, wah, wah, wah, wah, wah. But eventually I got to learn what those wah, wah, wah means. I hope. Well this is about, it’s just a single phrase about peace on earth. And basically, in Farsi, you say “solh e jahaani,” and it means peace on earth.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Alex Wolfson (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject does not have very many apparent signature sounds. He does, however, have a tendency to include an intrusive “yuh” sound in words like “two” and “news.” He also changes his “th” sounds into “t” sounds. In addition, he changes the vowel of “kit” words to the vowel of “fleece.”

COMMENTARY BY: Alex Wolfson (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.