Iran 9

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 49

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1953

PLACE OF BIRTH: Tehran, Iran

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Iranian (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject moved to the United States in the 1970s.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Amber McIntosh

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/12/2002

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Tehran, Iran, in 1953, and I raise in Tehran. Uh, after graduating from high school, I got married with an Iranian guy. And we came to United State. When I was growing up, uh it was kind of, you know, fun for us, because uh we had a lot of, uh, cousins and relatives and friends. And every afternoon, our house, it was full of, you know, guests. And, uh, we knew that every day someone is coming to visit us. There’s a very famous, um, poem. That it said [QUOTES A BRIEF FARSI TEXT], means if you’re, uh, smart, and then you can do anything. So it’s, uh, very famous; everybody in Iran, they know this.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Amber McIntosh

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.