Ireland 14

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 70

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 3/02/1940

PLACE OF BIRTH: Balleyhealy, County Sligo, Ireland

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Irish/Caucasian

OCCUPATION: retired

EDUCATION: junior college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was raised in Boleyhelly, Monasteraden, County Sligo, Ireland, until age 16. She moved to Chicago, Illinois, in the United States, at age 16 and lived there until age 27. She then moved to Moygara, Gurteen, County Sligo, Ireland, and has resided there since.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 17/07/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Oh, when I think Ire- the Irish people had suffered so much from invasion and being taken over all down through the centuries that they fought so hard for, to have independence, and to own the land and their houses, I think it is, it more so than any other nationality in the world the Irish would be the the most property owners, but is it a basic insecurity that has been built in them, or what I do not know.  Well, I mean I can live here now because I have a car and I can commute and I can go into town, I can, do you know what I mean, and I have, as my own children would say, I have the best of both worlds.  Right?  I have the lovely countryside, do you know what I mean, second to none, do you know what I mean, like, really, and all my kids were the same here.  But they had participated in all the sports in the village wherever they where, I had a field out there could be converted into a sports field in a matter of two hours with a machine.  Do you understand?  You know what I mean?  I mean before I went to America was once in Sligo, went in to have my tonsils out in 1950, twenty-ninth of June, I was confirmed in the morn, had mys tonsils out in the afternoon, that’s the truth!  Do you know what I mean, like really?  And that was the day, and there was no such thing as calling up say we’ll take another day.  No, you just went and I went off, went directly from the church, never went home or nothing; went there with my white dress and everything.  That’s it.  You know.  So, so that’s just, do you know what I mean, really?  You know.  But then materialistic things have come in here terrible. I mean we have beautiful houses, right, David?  From one end of this road to the other there’s some beautiful houses. I am the only woman home during the day.  Right?  I have more children here, no one belonging to myself.  Do you understand what I mean, like really?  You know, you go into their houses, you wouldn’t get a cup of tea.  I mean you know there’s an old priest I know, well, a young priest I know, but his dad was very old and he lived here over the country. And a young couple moved in next door. Now Paddy Joyce is his name, and everybody came into Paddy’s. There was another old man came in everyday, and the kettle was on the range and Tom and Paddy have their tea everyday, right?  So this young woman moved in next door and she never stopped asking these two old guys to come in to visit.  So one day Paddy took the bull by the horns and he said, “Well I’m going in.”  So he went in, and, you know, and he had a great visit, and he arrives over to Tom to tell Tom about the house, you see, and he goes on and he goes on and he goes on now it’s the, it’s the, it’s Tom’s son was telling me this is the priest Martin Joyce’s; his name Martin Jennings and Martin was telling me anyhow, and he knew the father was getting, you know a little bit, and finally he said to Father Jennings’ father Paddy, he said Pad, “You go making any tea?  “Ah sure!” he said in that kitchen, he said, he said you got a cup of tea; ah, no, he said you couldn’t ask that woman to go making tea, no, but the kitchen was so beautiful you wouldn’t want to turn on a cooker.

TRANSCRIBED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 17/07/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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