Ireland 15

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 85

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 9/11/1924

PLACE OF BIRTH: Tarbert, County Kerry, Ireland

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Irish/Caucasian

OCCUPATION: retired primary teacher

EDUCATION: university

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born and raised in Tarbert, County Kerry, Ireland, until age 13. She lived in Monaghan, Ireland, from age 13 to 18. She then lived in Limerick, Ireland, for twelve years. She has lived in Cork, Ireland, for the past fifty-two years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject taught Gaelic for 44 years.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 13/07/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

[Subject speaks in Gaelic and then, when prompted by the interviewer, repeats what she just said in English.] Tis windy, I said. We’re here in on our holidays, I said we’ve just had a nice meal and we met two nice Americans, I said a little girl with a lovely smile and, uh, the, the weather is, the weather isn’t great; the weather isn’t great but, uh, it’s not raining today, but it’s windy. Well, I grew up in Tarbert in a village North Kerry on the Shannon and, uh, went away to a boarding school at the 13, uh, I loved it Saint Louis’s Convent did you ever hear of Saint Louis?  They were a French order.  I loved it; I was sorry leaving it went from there to the training college in Limerick teachers’ training college where we did a university degree.  And, uh, I forgot [unclear] got a job in Ennis County Clare for twelve months and then eventually came to Cork in the year 1958; that’s the year we got married; we got married in, in the cathedral in Killarney, and we’re married fifty-two years since the twenty-eighth of June, and, uh, well I’m putting up with him. [Interviewer: I’ve been to the Lake House at Killarney.] That’s where we were, that’s where we had our our wedding breakfast at the lake hotel. Did you like it? Yeah [unclear], that’s where we had our wedding breakfast, and then we drove from there up to the north, th-, there was no trouble in the north in those days, was just you know to just before we we got out [unclear], it was pending the, the trouble was pending, so we got out of it [unclear]. No, it started about 1959. and [unclear] the real trouble was in the sixties; that was the real trouble time; oh, it is very old, yes, yes, there are a lot of changes there, though since we were there they have outdoor baths now, you know that outdoor, outdoor bath, what did you call them? Hot tub, not a Jacuzzi, hot tub, hot tub for, for tourists; uh, everybody who stays there, we never, we did, we didn’t try it out at all. [She speaks in Gaelic] Which means may the road rise up to you, may you have best of luck … [she again speaks in Gaelic] … would be the blessing of God, God’s blessing.

TRANSCRIBED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 13/07/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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