Italy 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 34

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1965

PLACE OF BIRTH: Venice, Italy

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Italian

OCCUPATION: university student in journalism

EDUCATION: Subject has university degree in foreign language and American studies.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived in London, England, for over a year and then in Munich, Germany. She then traveled around Europe and Central America before moving to the United States.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject was educated in Trieste, Munich, London and Lawrence, Kansas, in the United States, and has fluent idiomatic English with a slight Italian accent. Her English is a mix of British and American.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 1999

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Ah, OK, I was born in Venice, Italy. And I was raised around Venice, in a small town, when my family moved out of Venice because of the tourists. Ah, and, ah, I lived there most of my life. My family still live there. Um, I studied at the University of Trieste, which is about 100 miles from where I live in Venice and, um, I graduated in ’93 in, um, foreign language and American studies. Then I got a scholarship, I came to Lawrence, um, and I started in my American studies degree, I finished my American studies degree and now I’m about to finish my journalism degree. Um, I lived in England for over a year, in London. And, ah, I just was there, I liked it there, so I took a year off of school. Um, and then I lived in Germany too ’cause I needed to learn German, ’cause it was one of my majors and I’d never studied German before in my life, so I say, “Ok, maybe I better go there” ’cause  it’s very close to where I live. It’s about six-hour drive, so it was almost as being home. Ah, then I spent some other time in Germany because of some research I was doing for my thesis. What else? [sigh] I travel around all Europe and Central America. Traveling is my, one of my hobbies. I, I remembered running on a beach and stumbling into somebody and I started crying but suddenly, ah, I look up and it was my father. And I don’t know if just, was just running away … was just trying to save be because I did … I used to go on, on, you know, in the water and he was afraid. But that … actually I think that’s my earliest one. I think I was like … I was 2 or 3. I don’t know how old I was.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Mitchell Kelly

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/01/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

If you are a dialect researcher, or an actor using this sample to develop your skill in the accent, please see my instruction manual at www.paulmeier.com. As the speaker in this sample is a unique individual, it is highly unlikely that she will conform to my analysis in every detail. But you will find it interesting and instructive to notice which of my “signature sounds” and “additional features” (always suggested only as commonly heard features of the accent) are widely used by most speakers of the accent, and which are subject to variation from individual to individual.

COMMENTARY BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 22/10/2016

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