Kansas 2

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples.  IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 50

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/09/1949

PLACE OF BIRTH: Kansas City

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasisan

OCCUPATION: realtor

EDUCATION: university degree

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She lived in Kansas City, on both the Kansas and Missouri sides, for most of her life.  She took her degree at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas, and during the Vietnam War, she lived in Wurzburg, Germany, for a year, where her husband was stationed with the U.S. Army.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

She is the mother of subject Kansas 1 and wife of Kansas 3.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Shawn Muller

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 18/08/1999

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Uh, the first place I remember living is in an apartment, um, in the Kansas City, Missouri, area, and it was kind of a well-known apartment complex back then called President Gardens.  I actually lived there till after I had completed my kindergarten year, uh, which was — kindergarten was held in the basement of one of the apartment buildings there in President Gardens, and it was actually part of the Center School District.  And I remember my teacher very well.  Her name was Miss Milke, and I remember one of the best, uh, experiences of the day, was when, uh, at snack time she would take this little silver puncher and punch holes in the top of the milk bottles, in this little silver-colored packaging, and insert a straw so that we could each drink our milk from a bottle.  And there were no throwaway things in those days.  Everything was basically recycled, and we got our milk passed around to us in these little, um, bottles, little glass bottles.  And I remember one day Miss Milke overlooked me.  It was my turn to punch the holes in — in the tops of the bottles, and I’d been so looking forward to it, and I knew it was my turn, and she overlooked me one day, which sent me home crying into the arms of my mother, who wrote me a note the next day to Miss Milke asking her to remember that it was my turn to punch the holes in the tops of the milk cartons.  And of course she was very angry with me, for going home and telling my mother about that, but she still gave me my turn.  And in fact recently, ran into a couple people that went all through elementary school with me.  And we saw each other in a restaurant, at which time we all together sang the Marlborough school cheer.  [Sings:] “Three cheers for Marlborough, the best school in the land!  Three cheers for Marlborough, we’ll give a great big hand.  The blue and gold we proudly hail, the best school in the land!  The ‘something-something’ was great, it really was first-rate.  The students were the best you’ll find in any state.  And so you know that we’re the top, we’re always up-to-date.  M-A-R-L-B-O-R … O-U-G-H!  Yay, Marlborough!”

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 08/03/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.