Kansas 5

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 21

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1980

PLACE OF BIRTH: Hutchinson, Kansas

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: some university

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Ginger Bartkoski (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/03/2001

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Hutchison, Kansas, and we lived, um, six miles out of town, and, um, both my parents worked inside of Hutch.  And, um, I went to a smaller school outside of Hutch, called Buhler.  It was very tight; [giggling] we had a tight community.  And, um, there were several smaller communities outside of Hutch.  It’s the Bible belt [laughs], and, um, I don’t know; it kind of shaped like what we learned in school, like everything. We’d have to memorize like, “Old Man and the Sea,” we’d have to memorize like the, the, um, 14 or whatever parallels to the Bible, and like, I mean, like, if you knew the Bible, it wasn’t that hard, but like, if you didn’t know anything about it, like, it was completely hard.  An’ my parents didn’t go to church, like.  We never went to church, so I was like — they all kind of a upper hand on me, but, we had — there were some interesting contrasts, ’cause like, we’d get people, like, it was just so, so much ostracism towards people who had just moved there, an’ like a lot of people from other countries would move in, and a lot of times weren’t accepted.  Most of the time they got along, but … uh, kind of German; there was a lot of Germans.  There’s a ton of Rathsliffes and Meyers.  My gran’ma and gran’pa’s name was Blumenschein.  Um, I don’t know, they seemed ve- … it’s jus- … it was pretty German.  We ate lots of zwiebachen and kraut.  Mom makes good kraut.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/03/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.