Louisiana 7

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 54

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/11/1959

PLACE OF BIRTH: Lafayette, Louisiana

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: Elementary School Principal

EDUCATION: master’s degree in education

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The speaker grew up in Monroe, in northern Louisiana, until age 29 when he moved to Arlington, Texas, and has lived there since.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Stephen Howell (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 17/03/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Growing up with my sister, I always felt like I got the short end of the stick. So, one day, before I was old enough to drive, uh, my parents were gone for the day and I decided I was going to take the car for a drive on our long driveway — ‘cause we had a long driveway, about four-hundred feet deep, with pine trees on each side. So I backed the car out and went down the driveway, up and back several times. Well, my mom had these big, tall bushes, oh, about five of them on the side of the driveway; so when I was backing up one time, I ran into one and I knocked it out of its roots, out, out of the deal. So I shoved the bush back down, so that they wouldn’t know that I’d been driving while they were gone. Well, when they got back, uh, my mother was out working in the yard, and she’s kind of small, and she actually bumped the bush and it fell over. And I just kept saying that I think, [laugh] I think, [laugh] you must have hit the bush and knocked it over. [Laughing] And the whole big bush probably weighed sixty pounds, fell over out of the dirt.

We used to play a lot, and we used to do pranks and all, and we could ride our bikes all the way down our driveway and kind of go in, towards the back and make a kind of a slight left turn, and go down the embankment toward the bayou. So we were doing on our bikes and we’d get to the end, and we’d power slide and stop. Well, my sister, who I was always trying to get back at for things she did to me, she was going down — and we told her to go — she went down there really fast, lost control, hit, uh, a log right at the edge, the front edge of the bayou, and flipped over into the water. And I started laughing real hard, until my dad came out, and then I had to act like I was really sorry for her, and I got her out of the water and got her glasses.

OK, well my, my, my dad was the principal when I was in high school, and then when I graduated in 1977 he became superintendent of the schools for Ouachita Parish. Well, after one of the school board meetings he was followed home, uh, by this vehicle, and, and he came in the house and it was late, about 11:30, and he said, “You need to get your, um, shotgun ’cause there’s some guy following me.” It was a, g-, I remember it was a blue Mustang, like a 1970 or ‘71 Mustang. The guy pulled in our driveway, or came up to our driveway, up to the, toward the front, and we went out and I had a shotgun and he had a pistol, and we aimed it at the guy, uh’s, vehicle — and um, he stood, he sat there for a minute and then he squealed out, and backed out of the driveway and took off down the road.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Stephen Howell (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 17/03/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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