Macedonia 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 25

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 01/06/1989

PLACE OF BIRTH: Prilep, Macedonia

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Macedonian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: Subject graduated high school and was a college undergraduate at the time of this interview.

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She lived in Macedonia until she was 21 years old and has lived in the United States since.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Emily James (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/04/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, here, let’s say if you, like, if you go out and you’re, like, hitting on somebody and you get to do something with the guy, the possibilities for him, for you to see the guy are very tiny. Like, he’s gonna, like, I don’t know, you might, like, sleep with him, and next day, it’s a new day, and probably you’ll never see him, because you don’t know. In Macedonia, everybody knows each other. The towns, like the cities, are not that big. People are hanging out to the same places, same day, like same friends. So if you try to do something with some guy, most likely if not you, but your cousin, or your friend, or your friend’s boyfriend, or a cousin’s cousin, whatever. They will know the guy and there’s no way he’s going to escape. So, you most likely going to see him again, maybe you wouldn’t do anything, but your like I remember him from somewhere. The people there — they’re more, like, concerned about how people will look at them. They’re more concerned like, “Oh, what they going to think about me” because people will gossip. The country by itself is like two million people. And I would say probably there are a handful of, like, gay people. And people know them. Its very, very weird for y… I’m born and raised there; I’ve never seen two guys or two girls holding hands. Ever. It’s, people don’t do it, people don’t appreciate it, people think it’s wrong, people think if you want to do something, keep it in the closet. Don’t go out. Because, if your parents find out you’re gay, you’re out of the house. That’s so embarrassing, that’s like humiliating. Here, the lifestyle different. You don’t agree with your parents, and you move out on your own and you do whatever you want. But in Macedonia, you can’t; where you going to go, you don’t know anybody, you need to have a degree to find a job. It’s not like “that’s it I’m over, and I’m leaving, and I’ll find work at McDonald’s.” There is just like two McDonald’s in the whole country. And people don’t go out and eat fast food because we don’t really have a lot of fast food. We do have, uh, like shops and coffee shops and everything, but you live with your parents and she’s taking care of it. So it’s really, really different. and I’m glad that I’m coming from place that I get to know different culture and different tradition. I’m 25 years old, and I’m still talking with my mom like she’s my friend. Maybe, because my mom, she had me when I was 17, so we kind of grew up together, but still …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Emily James (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/04/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

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