Madagascar 1

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Madagascar 1A:


Madagascar 1B:

 

BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: N/A

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Madagascar

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Exact ethnicity is unknown, but he is a native of Madagascar.

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: graduate student, specializing in bio-diversity of Madagascar

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

He spent time in New York City and Massachusetts, and he speaks of his experiences there in the unscripted speech.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject knows Malagasy and also French. He studied English in school and has been exposed extensively to it during his time in the United States.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/2004

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

[Recording 1A]: I’m originally from Madagascar.  I was born in a small city which is called, uh — close to the city [unclear].  I took English class at the secondary school in Madagascar.  We had English class just, uh, starting the — to happen — too, I was very weak.  And [unclear] during two years.  And when I got to the high school, I still had some English, uh, classes but, uh, just once — once a week.  After I got my bachelor degree, I went to the University of [unclear], which is the capital of Madagascar.  And, uh, after university, uh, I didn’t — I didn’t have any more English classes.  So my English training was a little bit, uh, stopped there, for the moment — that moment.  Until I got my graduate degree from the university, which is called GEA [unclear].  After that, I started to — to do my field research with some English-speaking people.  Uh, and so I was, uh, involved, uh, within the, uh, conservation, uh, organization, uh, in my, uh — in my country, [unclear].  And I followed [unclear] English training …

[Recording 1B]: … at the American center over there for three months.  And I, uh, applied for fellowship to come to the State and to study up on birds.  So I got a fellowship from the American Museum of Natural History in York City.  And I did my master degree there [unclear] university of bird of Madagascar.  After I got my master, I — I decided to continue my study.  One professor here at UMass just ask — asked me at that time if I wanted to — to come to Massachusett.  So I said, “Yes, I will like to.”  So I applied for to come to the University of Massachusett and I was accepted.  And so since then, I — I have been working on my — my PhD.  Uh, Madagascar is a big country and there about — at there, eighteen ethnic groups.  And, uh, all the ethnic groups have different [unclear] dialect.  But, uh, we in Madagascar, we can—it’s not like Africa.  [unclear] Africa [unclear] country cannot understand the other country.  But in Madagascar, we understand.  We can communicate with each other, uh, no matter where — where we are from or what dialect we are using.  So there is some — some connection between, some binding element in Malagasy people.  Uh, [unclear] that was the colonization period and, uh, during that time, the French [unclear] dominated the whole — the whole country.  And the main language used during that time was French.  And even — even today, I mean, we use more Malagasy at different, uh, [unclear] offices, uh, today.  But before, we only use French as a [unclear] language.  I speak Malagasy.  We always say Malagasy as the language from Madagascar.  We don’t really distinguish the dialect of Madagascar.  And, um, Malagasy’s the [unclear] — the language that we all use.  We consider our dialects like one because we — we can, uh, understand each other with that.  And as [unclear] French and, uh, English.  [The rest is spoken in Malagasy and French.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: John Wright

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/08/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Observe the lack of aspiration on initial voiceless obstruents; the occasional use of the alveolar nasal for the velar; the even stress pattern, and the use of pure vowels in all syllables of some polysyllabic words; his command of the English semi-vowel “r”; and his tonal placement, which is reminiscent of other Eastern African speakers.

COMMENTARY BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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