Maine 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Portland, Maine

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: theatre student

EDUCATION: some university

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

He was raised in Falmouth, Maine.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Perhaps because of his age, his Maine roots are not conspicuous from his speech.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/11/2004

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born at Mercy Hospital in Portland, Maine, actually right across the street from the church at which I was christened. Uh, I’ve grown up in Falmouth, Maine, my entire life, which is the first town north of Portland.  Uh, it’s a pretty small town.  It’s right around 8,000 people.  Uh, went to — my high school was right around 600, when I graduated.  My class was, I think a hundred and 32.  I was — it’s a small enough town that I … knew pretty much everybody in the high school, and I had group of friends that I grew up knowing, and most … By the time, they were … People moved in and out, but pretty much they’re the same group of people I grew up with my entire life.  I summered in Downeast Maine, uh, on an island called Burnt Island, which is off the north end of a larger island called Isle Lahoe, in Penobscot Bay.  Um, Isle Au Haut is where my mother and father met, an’ fell in love, an’ got married, and had my older brother, an’ shortly after realized that it’s not necessary a — necessarily the proper place to raise a child, because education an’… Economically it just wasn’t very smart.  So they moved off the island, after my father and mother having lived there for eight years, and moved down to the Portland area ’n’ found a house in Falmouth, where my mother has lived ever since. Uh, the Downeast accent is, well, the sort of northern New England dialect I always, I, t– you can hear it all over the state but obviously, called Downeast.  I think it would obvious, pretty much originated in Downeast Maine, which I’m sure sort of a strange term, ’s people who’ve never really been to Maine wouldn’t really understand.  You have to … from where I live, you have to go north, and then you have to go east, and then you have to go south again, to get to Downeast Maine, because, if you tried to drive directly there from where I would, you’d be driving across water. You have to go north and east and down, so, hence the term Downeast, I think.  It’s a very rural, not — very sparse population.  I mean, the state of Maine is huge, and there are only a million people that live there, roughly, so it’s, uh, the Downeast Maine is very rural.  The part that I grew up in — Portland area — is really only the popula– heavily populated area. Um, in Downeast Maine, there’re lots of blue-collar people that are living, fishing. Uh, obviously, lumber is a major thing in Maine, is what I think our number one economic resource.  Eh, but it’s, it’s a beautiful place, and there’s lots o– lots of people living there that, uh,you know, it’s, it’s hard; it’s not an easy life to live in Downeast Maine there.  The winters are harsh, especially on the water. Uh, the food, and lobstering’s one of the very, very hard.  It’s lots of work, long hours and, uh, definitely not a whole lot of reward.  There’s money to be made there, but it’s, it’s not without lots and lots of hard work. [Subject re-reads “Comma” in a Downeast dialect, through “sorry for the beautiful bird…”]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/03/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.